Presentation Title

Assessment of Knowledge, Barriers, and Facilitators for Colorectal Cancer Screening in South Florida

Speaker Credentials

DO

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Format

Poster

Start Date

6-11-2020 10:15 AM

End Date

6-11-2020 10:30 AM

Abstract

Objective: To assess overall knowledge of colorectal cancer, and to ascertain positive and negative factors that influence the decision to obtain screening colonoscopy Background: Despite being one of the most common and deadliest cancers in the world, rates of screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) surveillance among eligible adults remains sub-optimal. Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) shows that 21.7 million eligible adults have never been screened for CRC. Also, 81% of adults of have never been screened are people aged 50 to 64 years old. Methods: A simple questionnaire was disseminated to clinic patients on day of visit which was completed on the same day. Results: We evaluated 104 patients with a mean age of 46.6 +/- 18 yo. 58.3% were female. 43.3% were older than 50 years. 43.9% were white. 46.1% were born in the US. 91.3% reported adequate health literacy with no significant difference among gender or age groups. 21.%, 52.2% and 26.7% completed highschool, college, and graduate education respectively. 44% qualify for a colonoscopy based on the following criteria: age >50yo or age >40yo plus family history. However only 56.5% of those with criteria had a colonoscopy. When citing reasons why, 11.9% reported no recommendation by physician, and 7.1% considered it unimportant. 30.1% knew that 50yo is the appropriate age to start screening. 20.4% reported being aware of alternative methods of screening. 59.1% were aware that the American Society recommends colonoscopy for every American. 28.3% were aware that colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the world. 49% said having my doctor counsel me on the importance of screening for colorectal cancer would influence me to obtain screening colonoscopy. Conclusion: There is a serious knowledge gap regarding colorectal cancer screening among patients. At least 19% of patients could possibly be influenced to obtain screening with simple physician counseling. Grants: No grants or funding

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Nov 6th, 10:15 AM Nov 6th, 10:30 AM

Assessment of Knowledge, Barriers, and Facilitators for Colorectal Cancer Screening in South Florida

Objective: To assess overall knowledge of colorectal cancer, and to ascertain positive and negative factors that influence the decision to obtain screening colonoscopy Background: Despite being one of the most common and deadliest cancers in the world, rates of screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) surveillance among eligible adults remains sub-optimal. Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) shows that 21.7 million eligible adults have never been screened for CRC. Also, 81% of adults of have never been screened are people aged 50 to 64 years old. Methods: A simple questionnaire was disseminated to clinic patients on day of visit which was completed on the same day. Results: We evaluated 104 patients with a mean age of 46.6 +/- 18 yo. 58.3% were female. 43.3% were older than 50 years. 43.9% were white. 46.1% were born in the US. 91.3% reported adequate health literacy with no significant difference among gender or age groups. 21.%, 52.2% and 26.7% completed highschool, college, and graduate education respectively. 44% qualify for a colonoscopy based on the following criteria: age >50yo or age >40yo plus family history. However only 56.5% of those with criteria had a colonoscopy. When citing reasons why, 11.9% reported no recommendation by physician, and 7.1% considered it unimportant. 30.1% knew that 50yo is the appropriate age to start screening. 20.4% reported being aware of alternative methods of screening. 59.1% were aware that the American Society recommends colonoscopy for every American. 28.3% were aware that colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the world. 49% said having my doctor counsel me on the importance of screening for colorectal cancer would influence me to obtain screening colonoscopy. Conclusion: There is a serious knowledge gap regarding colorectal cancer screening among patients. At least 19% of patients could possibly be influenced to obtain screening with simple physician counseling. Grants: No grants or funding