Presentation Title

Salmonella Meningitis: A Rare, Deceptive and Often Fatal Infectious Disease

Speaker Credentials

MS-II

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

Format

Poster

Start Date

6-11-2020 12:15 PM

End Date

6-11-2020 12:30 PM

Abstract

Objective: Our study aims to highlight the challenges, which this disease can present to health professionals including diagnosis and treatment. Background: Salmonella meningitis is a rare, but potentially fatal infection. The risk factors for acquiring this infection and its neurological outcomes were also analyzed. Methods: Using PubMed database, we selected 32 cases of salmonella meningitis reported during the last twenty years globally. We found that the infection is most common in patients who are under the age of 1 year and/or immunosuppressed. Additional risk factors included exposure to reptiles and poultry, and recent brain surgery. Overall, a total 12 different serovars of Salmonella were identified as causative agents. The most concerning finding was that 16 patients (50%) did not receive prompt treatment, due to misdiagnose or failure to seek medical care in a timely manner. The most common treatment regiments included 3rd generation of cephalosporins, often in various combination with other drugs. Conclusions: Our research helps to increase awareness about this infrequent form of meningitis, its diagnosis and treatment. Our study stresses the importance of recognizing rare causes of infection and recommend the use of a 3rd generation cephalosporin in combination with other medications for patients diagnosed with Salmonella Meningitis.

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Nov 6th, 12:15 PM Nov 6th, 12:30 PM

Salmonella Meningitis: A Rare, Deceptive and Often Fatal Infectious Disease

Objective: Our study aims to highlight the challenges, which this disease can present to health professionals including diagnosis and treatment. Background: Salmonella meningitis is a rare, but potentially fatal infection. The risk factors for acquiring this infection and its neurological outcomes were also analyzed. Methods: Using PubMed database, we selected 32 cases of salmonella meningitis reported during the last twenty years globally. We found that the infection is most common in patients who are under the age of 1 year and/or immunosuppressed. Additional risk factors included exposure to reptiles and poultry, and recent brain surgery. Overall, a total 12 different serovars of Salmonella were identified as causative agents. The most concerning finding was that 16 patients (50%) did not receive prompt treatment, due to misdiagnose or failure to seek medical care in a timely manner. The most common treatment regiments included 3rd generation of cephalosporins, often in various combination with other drugs. Conclusions: Our research helps to increase awareness about this infrequent form of meningitis, its diagnosis and treatment. Our study stresses the importance of recognizing rare causes of infection and recommend the use of a 3rd generation cephalosporin in combination with other medications for patients diagnosed with Salmonella Meningitis.