Presentation Title

Spliceosomal Proteins as Targets for Melanoma Therapy

Speaker Credentials

Adjunct Faculty

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

College

College of Allopathic Medicine

Format

Presentation

Start Date

6-11-2020 12:45 PM

End Date

6-11-2020 1:00 PM

Abstract

Objective. To identify target(s) and mechanism of action of novel anti-melanoma lead 2155-14. Background. Despite recent advances in melanoma drug discovery, the average overall survival of patients with late stage metastatic melanoma is approximately 3 years, suggesting a need for approaches that identify new melanoma targets. Methods. We utilized biotinylated analog of 2155-14 to pull down its targets from melanoma cells. Proteomics in combination with western blot were used to identify the targets. Mechanism of action of 2155-14 was determined using flow cytometry, RT-PCR, microscopy, western blot, and enzymatic activity assays. Clinical significance was analyzed using databases. Results. We identified ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX1 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) H1, H2 and A2/B1 as targets of anti-melanoma compound 2155-14. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first report suggesting that these proteins could be targeted for melanoma therapy. Mechanistic investigations showed that 2155-14 induces ER stress leading to potentiation of basal autophagy resulting in melanoma cell death in BRAF and NRAS mutated melanoma cells. Database analysis showed potential correlation with overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients. Conclusion. Identification of mode of action of 2155-14 may provide insight into novel therapies against a broad range of melanoma subtypes. These studies were enabled by the novel probe derived from a mixture-based library, an important class of chemical biology tools for discovering novel targets. Grants. Auburn University Faculty start-up funds. TPIMS Faculty start-up funds. Auburn University Intramural Grant Program: “Target Identification of Novel Anti-Melanoma Compounds”.

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Nov 6th, 12:45 PM Nov 6th, 1:00 PM

Spliceosomal Proteins as Targets for Melanoma Therapy

Objective. To identify target(s) and mechanism of action of novel anti-melanoma lead 2155-14. Background. Despite recent advances in melanoma drug discovery, the average overall survival of patients with late stage metastatic melanoma is approximately 3 years, suggesting a need for approaches that identify new melanoma targets. Methods. We utilized biotinylated analog of 2155-14 to pull down its targets from melanoma cells. Proteomics in combination with western blot were used to identify the targets. Mechanism of action of 2155-14 was determined using flow cytometry, RT-PCR, microscopy, western blot, and enzymatic activity assays. Clinical significance was analyzed using databases. Results. We identified ATP-dependent RNA helicase DDX1 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) H1, H2 and A2/B1 as targets of anti-melanoma compound 2155-14. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first report suggesting that these proteins could be targeted for melanoma therapy. Mechanistic investigations showed that 2155-14 induces ER stress leading to potentiation of basal autophagy resulting in melanoma cell death in BRAF and NRAS mutated melanoma cells. Database analysis showed potential correlation with overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients. Conclusion. Identification of mode of action of 2155-14 may provide insight into novel therapies against a broad range of melanoma subtypes. These studies were enabled by the novel probe derived from a mixture-based library, an important class of chemical biology tools for discovering novel targets. Grants. Auburn University Faculty start-up funds. TPIMS Faculty start-up funds. Auburn University Intramural Grant Program: “Target Identification of Novel Anti-Melanoma Compounds”.