Presentation Title

Multiple Mini-Interview Curriculum Mapping: A New Method to Personalize the MMI Process for Medical Schools

Speaker Credentials

BS

College

College of Allopathic Medicine

Format

Poster

Start Date

6-11-2020 10:00 AM

End Date

6-11-2020 10:15 AM

Abstract

Multiple Mini-Interview Curriculum Mapping: A New Method to Personalize the MMI Process for Medical Schools Nicholas Patete, MS-II, College of Allopathic Medicine, Kyle Bauckman Ph.D, Assistant Professor, College of Allopathic Medicine The process of applying to medical school is extremely competitive with only 41% of applicants matriculating into an American allopathic medical school. The number of applicants in 2019 was 53,371 and each applicant applied to an average number of 17 individual American allopathic medical schools making a total of 869,819 applications.1 Despite this large application pool, medical schools have the difficult task of selecting future physicians who match the individual school’s mission and objectives. A holistic review approach, as suggested by the AAMC, is important in order to select not only applicants who will make good medical students, but also applicants who match the individual medical school’s goals and mission statement.2 We are proposing a new Multiple Mini-interview (MMI) strategy to better personalize the process for our own school which can be adopted by other medical schools in the U.S. and Canada. The malleability of the MMI is beneficial as it allows schools to provide a holistic review which is not “one size fits all”, but instead is personalized to individual school goals and mission statements. By mapping MMI questions to our school Medical Education Program Objectives (MEPOs), we plan to rate applicant’s MMI performance based on the individual’s performance in each objective. We will then compare the applicant’s performance in each objective to other applicants and the average matriculant’s performance on radar charts. This method is intended to allow interviewers and admissions committee members to achieve higher confidence in accepting students who best fit the individual medical school. References: 2019 FACTS: Applicants and Matriculants Data. AAMC. https://www.aamc.org/data-reports/students-residents/interactive-data/2019-facts-applicants-and-matriculants-data. Accessed July 14, 2020. Holistic Review in Medical School Admissions. AAMC Students, Applicants and Residents. https://students-residents.aamc.org/choosing-medical-career/article/holistic-review-medical-school-admissions/. Published January 8, 2016. Accessed July 14, 2020.

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Nov 6th, 10:00 AM Nov 6th, 10:15 AM

Multiple Mini-Interview Curriculum Mapping: A New Method to Personalize the MMI Process for Medical Schools

Multiple Mini-Interview Curriculum Mapping: A New Method to Personalize the MMI Process for Medical Schools Nicholas Patete, MS-II, College of Allopathic Medicine, Kyle Bauckman Ph.D, Assistant Professor, College of Allopathic Medicine The process of applying to medical school is extremely competitive with only 41% of applicants matriculating into an American allopathic medical school. The number of applicants in 2019 was 53,371 and each applicant applied to an average number of 17 individual American allopathic medical schools making a total of 869,819 applications.1 Despite this large application pool, medical schools have the difficult task of selecting future physicians who match the individual school’s mission and objectives. A holistic review approach, as suggested by the AAMC, is important in order to select not only applicants who will make good medical students, but also applicants who match the individual medical school’s goals and mission statement.2 We are proposing a new Multiple Mini-interview (MMI) strategy to better personalize the process for our own school which can be adopted by other medical schools in the U.S. and Canada. The malleability of the MMI is beneficial as it allows schools to provide a holistic review which is not “one size fits all”, but instead is personalized to individual school goals and mission statements. By mapping MMI questions to our school Medical Education Program Objectives (MEPOs), we plan to rate applicant’s MMI performance based on the individual’s performance in each objective. We will then compare the applicant’s performance in each objective to other applicants and the average matriculant’s performance on radar charts. This method is intended to allow interviewers and admissions committee members to achieve higher confidence in accepting students who best fit the individual medical school. References: 2019 FACTS: Applicants and Matriculants Data. AAMC. https://www.aamc.org/data-reports/students-residents/interactive-data/2019-facts-applicants-and-matriculants-data. Accessed July 14, 2020. Holistic Review in Medical School Admissions. AAMC Students, Applicants and Residents. https://students-residents.aamc.org/choosing-medical-career/article/holistic-review-medical-school-admissions/. Published January 8, 2016. Accessed July 14, 2020.