Presentation Title

HTLV-1 Confirmed T Cell Lymphoma Presenting With Cutaneous Manifestations

Speaker Credentials

MD

Format

Poster

Start Date

6-11-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

6-11-2020 12:15 PM

Abstract

Human lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) is a virus that infects roughly 10-20 million individuals in the world. While most people remain asymptomatic, 3-5% of those infected will progress to more severe manifestations Adult T-Cell Lymphoma/Leukemia (ATLL)[1]. ATLL tends to have an aggressive course with poor prognosis, despite treatment. The patient was a 62 year male presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with 3 weeks of “groin rash” that had progressively worsened. Adamantly denied being sexually active in the prior 6 months. His vitals signs were as follows, T101.6F HR 109 O2 92% on RA RR 20 and normal blood pressure. His exam was notable for a chronically ill appearing male with temporal wasting. He had decreased breath sounds on the left side with tachypnea and increased work of breathing. Genitourinary exam was notable for large beefy-red draining ulcerative lesions to the inguinal area bilaterally, with marked lymphadenopathy. No penile lesions were noted. Blood work was notable for leukocytosis of 334,800 with lymphocytosis and blast cells. His chemistry panel demonstrated hyperkalemia and mild hypocalcemia. Imaging was notable for a large left sided pleural effusion with atelectasis. In consultation with the ICU, the decision was made to transfer the patient to a facility with more comprehensive oncologic services, to undergo emergent leukapheresis for suspected acute lymphoma/leukemia with blast crisis. On admission to the receiving facility, the patient was diagnosed with HTLV-1 confirmed T cell lymphoma/leukemia and underwent leukapheresis for 6 days until he unfortunately expired.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 6th, 12:00 PM Nov 6th, 12:15 PM

HTLV-1 Confirmed T Cell Lymphoma Presenting With Cutaneous Manifestations

Human lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) is a virus that infects roughly 10-20 million individuals in the world. While most people remain asymptomatic, 3-5% of those infected will progress to more severe manifestations Adult T-Cell Lymphoma/Leukemia (ATLL)[1]. ATLL tends to have an aggressive course with poor prognosis, despite treatment. The patient was a 62 year male presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with 3 weeks of “groin rash” that had progressively worsened. Adamantly denied being sexually active in the prior 6 months. His vitals signs were as follows, T101.6F HR 109 O2 92% on RA RR 20 and normal blood pressure. His exam was notable for a chronically ill appearing male with temporal wasting. He had decreased breath sounds on the left side with tachypnea and increased work of breathing. Genitourinary exam was notable for large beefy-red draining ulcerative lesions to the inguinal area bilaterally, with marked lymphadenopathy. No penile lesions were noted. Blood work was notable for leukocytosis of 334,800 with lymphocytosis and blast cells. His chemistry panel demonstrated hyperkalemia and mild hypocalcemia. Imaging was notable for a large left sided pleural effusion with atelectasis. In consultation with the ICU, the decision was made to transfer the patient to a facility with more comprehensive oncologic services, to undergo emergent leukapheresis for suspected acute lymphoma/leukemia with blast crisis. On admission to the receiving facility, the patient was diagnosed with HTLV-1 confirmed T cell lymphoma/leukemia and underwent leukapheresis for 6 days until he unfortunately expired.