Presentation Title

A Review on COVID-19 and SES in the United States. Does Low SES Increase Risk of Psychiatric Complications From COVID-19?

College

College of Allopathic Medicine

Format

Poster

Start Date

6-11-2020 1:30 PM

End Date

6-11-2020 1:45 PM

Abstract

A review on COVID-19 and SES in the United States. Does low SES increase risk of psychiatric complications from COVID-19? Sara Khan, MS-II, College of Allopathic Medicine Shivani Kaushal, MS-II, College of Allopathic Medicine Ron Israel, MD, Psychiatry, Aventura Hospital and Medical Center Sindhura Kompella, MD, Psychiatry, Aventura Hospital and Medical Center Clara Alvarez Villalba, MD, Program Director, Psychiatry, Aventura Hospital and Medical Center Objective. We will examine the relationship between coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) and socioeconomic status (SES) and elucidate which populations are most vulnerable to severe outcomes. Background. This review was completed in preparation for a retrospective study on whether low SES COVID-19 patients have an increased rate of psychiatric admissions compared to higher SES counterparts. We will summarize current research on COVID-19 and SES and explore whether low SES COVID-19 patients face an increased risk of psychiatric complications. Methods. We searched the PubMed database using terms “COVID-19 and SES” and “COVID-19 and socioeconomic status”. Selected studies evaluated SES in relation to confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases in the U.S. Results. Studies indicate that areas with higher rates of poverty, lower levels of education, and higher proportions of racial/ethnic minorities have an increased rate of COVID-19 cases, admissions, and fatality. However, these studies do not evaluate whether low SES patients face an increased rate of psychiatric complications. Conclusion. Research indicates COVID-19 disproportionately plagues populations with low SES. However, there is a lack of data on whether they are at heightened risk for psychiatric sequelae. Despite the growing evidence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in COVID-19 patients, studies do not evaluate sociodemographic factors in relation to psychiatric complications. Given that low SES is a risk factor for mental illness and COVID-19 may result in psychiatric symptoms, perhaps low SES patients are more likely to experience psychiatric sequelae. To bridge gaps in the literature, future studies should assess sociodemographic factors in COVID-19 patients with psychiatric complications.

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Nov 6th, 1:30 PM Nov 6th, 1:45 PM

A Review on COVID-19 and SES in the United States. Does Low SES Increase Risk of Psychiatric Complications From COVID-19?

A review on COVID-19 and SES in the United States. Does low SES increase risk of psychiatric complications from COVID-19? Sara Khan, MS-II, College of Allopathic Medicine Shivani Kaushal, MS-II, College of Allopathic Medicine Ron Israel, MD, Psychiatry, Aventura Hospital and Medical Center Sindhura Kompella, MD, Psychiatry, Aventura Hospital and Medical Center Clara Alvarez Villalba, MD, Program Director, Psychiatry, Aventura Hospital and Medical Center Objective. We will examine the relationship between coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) and socioeconomic status (SES) and elucidate which populations are most vulnerable to severe outcomes. Background. This review was completed in preparation for a retrospective study on whether low SES COVID-19 patients have an increased rate of psychiatric admissions compared to higher SES counterparts. We will summarize current research on COVID-19 and SES and explore whether low SES COVID-19 patients face an increased risk of psychiatric complications. Methods. We searched the PubMed database using terms “COVID-19 and SES” and “COVID-19 and socioeconomic status”. Selected studies evaluated SES in relation to confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases in the U.S. Results. Studies indicate that areas with higher rates of poverty, lower levels of education, and higher proportions of racial/ethnic minorities have an increased rate of COVID-19 cases, admissions, and fatality. However, these studies do not evaluate whether low SES patients face an increased rate of psychiatric complications. Conclusion. Research indicates COVID-19 disproportionately plagues populations with low SES. However, there is a lack of data on whether they are at heightened risk for psychiatric sequelae. Despite the growing evidence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in COVID-19 patients, studies do not evaluate sociodemographic factors in relation to psychiatric complications. Given that low SES is a risk factor for mental illness and COVID-19 may result in psychiatric symptoms, perhaps low SES patients are more likely to experience psychiatric sequelae. To bridge gaps in the literature, future studies should assess sociodemographic factors in COVID-19 patients with psychiatric complications.