Event Title

Custom 3D Printed Brainstem Model for Neuroanatomy Instruction

Speaker's Credentials

John Reynolds, MLIS, AHIP,

Melinda Johnson, MLS,

Cheryl C. Purvis Ph.D.,

Location

Atrium

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-1-2017 11:45 AM

End Date

21-1-2017 12:15 PM

Abstract

Introduction Commercial and computer anatomical models are readily available in university settings for human anatomy instruction. Commercial models are expensive but there is evidence that physical models may be more effective than computer simulations, but commercial models can be very expensive. Purpose The Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division Library lends anatomical models for student study and has an aging collection of rubber brainstems. These models are more than 50 years old, are no longer commercially available, and do not have all the features required for the University’s neuroanatomy students. Description of Innovation Librarians and anatomy faculty attempted to create new custom brainstem models with the library’s 3D printers. We downloaded MRI images of various brainstem structures from Japan’s Database Center for Life Science’s “BodyParts3D/Anatomography” repository, assembled and edited them with Meshmixer, NetFabb, and Meshlab software, and created physical representations of the images with the library’s TAZ-5 3D-printer. All the images and software are free to the general public. Outcomes We created 15-centimeter plastic brainstem models that had all the physical features required by the neuroanatomy instructor for student study. A copy of the 3D files were uploaded to the National Institute of Health’s 3D Print-Exchange for anyone to use. Discussion The models were inexpensive, at $2.30 each they cost about 1% of a commercial model, but time-consuming to make, about eight hours each, precluding making a brainstem for every student as originally intended. The models will be added to the library collection and made available for borrowing, instead.

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Jan 21st, 11:45 AM Jan 21st, 12:15 PM

Custom 3D Printed Brainstem Model for Neuroanatomy Instruction

Atrium

Introduction Commercial and computer anatomical models are readily available in university settings for human anatomy instruction. Commercial models are expensive but there is evidence that physical models may be more effective than computer simulations, but commercial models can be very expensive. Purpose The Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division Library lends anatomical models for student study and has an aging collection of rubber brainstems. These models are more than 50 years old, are no longer commercially available, and do not have all the features required for the University’s neuroanatomy students. Description of Innovation Librarians and anatomy faculty attempted to create new custom brainstem models with the library’s 3D printers. We downloaded MRI images of various brainstem structures from Japan’s Database Center for Life Science’s “BodyParts3D/Anatomography” repository, assembled and edited them with Meshmixer, NetFabb, and Meshlab software, and created physical representations of the images with the library’s TAZ-5 3D-printer. All the images and software are free to the general public. Outcomes We created 15-centimeter plastic brainstem models that had all the physical features required by the neuroanatomy instructor for student study. A copy of the 3D files were uploaded to the National Institute of Health’s 3D Print-Exchange for anyone to use. Discussion The models were inexpensive, at $2.30 each they cost about 1% of a commercial model, but time-consuming to make, about eight hours each, precluding making a brainstem for every student as originally intended. The models will be added to the library collection and made available for borrowing, instead.