Event Title

Training osteopathic medical students to be physician-scientists through meaningful student involvement

Location

Atrium

Format

Poster

Start Date

24-1-2015 4:30 PM

End Date

24-1-2015 5:00 PM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Studies have shown students’ participation in research activities has a positive influence on their intellectual growth as well as their cognitive, personal and professional development. There is a critical shortage of osteopathic physician-scientists who are vital members of the medical research community. The greatest barriers to involvement in research in medical school appear to be time, availability of research mentors, and formal teaching of research methodology.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this program is to train osteopathic medical students to conduct research by adapting research projects to fit their logistical needs.

METHODOLOGY: Students were trained by experienced research faculty and participated in a musculoskeletal research study of adults receiving care during international medical outreach trips from 2011-2014. They administered a questionnaire on musculoskeletal pain, self-reported health status, and healthcareseeking behavior. Students were instructed on research methods, ethical concerns, survey administration, statistical analysis, interpretation of findings, and dissemination of results.

RESULTS: As a direct result of the program, students who were mentored (N=9) produced 8 manuscripts and presentations at professional meetings as primary or co-author: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, Bureau on International Osteopathic Medicine International Seminar, Annual American Osteopathic Association Research Conference, and the Osteopathic Medical Conference & Exposition (with one student winning first prize in the poster competition). In addition, these experiences solidified students’ interest in involvement in future research activities.

CONCLUSIONS: One goal of our medical outreach programs is to involve students in well-designed and intellectually sound research projects. Additionally, we hoped to demonstrate intellectual curiously and scientific skepticism and improve the performance of medical care through the application of scientific method. Most graduates find careers in medical colleges, universities or major medical research centers. These physician-scientists bridge the gap between basic science and clinical practice.

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Jan 24th, 4:30 PM Jan 24th, 5:00 PM

Training osteopathic medical students to be physician-scientists through meaningful student involvement

Atrium

INTRODUCTION: Studies have shown students’ participation in research activities has a positive influence on their intellectual growth as well as their cognitive, personal and professional development. There is a critical shortage of osteopathic physician-scientists who are vital members of the medical research community. The greatest barriers to involvement in research in medical school appear to be time, availability of research mentors, and formal teaching of research methodology.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this program is to train osteopathic medical students to conduct research by adapting research projects to fit their logistical needs.

METHODOLOGY: Students were trained by experienced research faculty and participated in a musculoskeletal research study of adults receiving care during international medical outreach trips from 2011-2014. They administered a questionnaire on musculoskeletal pain, self-reported health status, and healthcareseeking behavior. Students were instructed on research methods, ethical concerns, survey administration, statistical analysis, interpretation of findings, and dissemination of results.

RESULTS: As a direct result of the program, students who were mentored (N=9) produced 8 manuscripts and presentations at professional meetings as primary or co-author: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, Bureau on International Osteopathic Medicine International Seminar, Annual American Osteopathic Association Research Conference, and the Osteopathic Medical Conference & Exposition (with one student winning first prize in the poster competition). In addition, these experiences solidified students’ interest in involvement in future research activities.

CONCLUSIONS: One goal of our medical outreach programs is to involve students in well-designed and intellectually sound research projects. Additionally, we hoped to demonstrate intellectual curiously and scientific skepticism and improve the performance of medical care through the application of scientific method. Most graduates find careers in medical colleges, universities or major medical research centers. These physician-scientists bridge the gap between basic science and clinical practice.