Event Title

Taking Back the Classroom: Monitoring Professionalism in Students

Location

Melnick

Format

Workshop

Start Date

15-1-2011 1:00 PM

End Date

15-1-2011 2:30 PM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Professor Coffman is the chair, program director, and administrator and leader dealing with student professionalism while presenting at various national conferences on professionalism. Professor Schugar is course director for Introduction to the PA Profession and a leader in student activities and has presented on professionalism at national conferences. Dr. Rafalko is the director of clinical medicine and surgery and has presented on various educational topics at HPERS since 2007.

PURPOSE: To identify characteristics of professionalism; list common issues related to nonprofessional behavior encountered with students; discuss various methods of evaluating professional behavior among students; discuss various methods of monitoring and correcting nonprofessional behavior; compose a plan to evaluate and hold students accountable for their professionalism.

METHODOLOGY: This workshop, through interactive case scenarios, questions and answers, discussion, and brainstorming, will result in and provide suggestions for solutions to problems on student professionalism.

RESULTS: As medical educators, our role must be to facilitate the acquisitions of professionalism, in addition to learning clinical medicine. This includes education on ethics, respect of patients, responsibility and commitment to the profession, reflection, and selfawareness. The manners in which these are implemented vary among programs, each struggling to define and measure this quality. This presentation will serve to evaluate various methods of assessing and evaluating professionalism in students with the anticipation of finding the concepts necessary to foster the development of professional behaviors. The 15-minute introduction will provide a short background on recent literature related to professionalism amongst health care students. In addition, a general list of characteristics of professionalism that are expected and the common issues related to nonprofessional behavior will be presented. The 60-minute discussion period will be composed of eliciting information from the audience related to various methods of evaluating and monitoring professionalism. In addition, the facilitators will distribute samples of various tools that are being utilized in physician assistant and medical school programs. These assessments will be compared and contrasted. In addition, the audience will also be asked to discuss how nonprofessional behavior is addressed in their programs. Throughout the discussion, the facilitators will be recording key points. The facilitators will then spend 15 minutes summarizing the discussions, highlighting the key points of discussion. These key points will be brought together to construct a plan to evaluate and monitor professionalism in students.

CONCLUSIONS: With the changing trend in student demographics, many health care educators struggle to monitor and enforce professional behavior in students. We will discuss common issues related to professionalism in regard to student behaviors. The audience will participate by sharing their ideas, situations, and policies while composing a plan to evaluate and hold students accountable for their professionalism.

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Jan 15th, 1:00 PM Jan 15th, 2:30 PM

Taking Back the Classroom: Monitoring Professionalism in Students

Melnick

INTRODUCTION: Professor Coffman is the chair, program director, and administrator and leader dealing with student professionalism while presenting at various national conferences on professionalism. Professor Schugar is course director for Introduction to the PA Profession and a leader in student activities and has presented on professionalism at national conferences. Dr. Rafalko is the director of clinical medicine and surgery and has presented on various educational topics at HPERS since 2007.

PURPOSE: To identify characteristics of professionalism; list common issues related to nonprofessional behavior encountered with students; discuss various methods of evaluating professional behavior among students; discuss various methods of monitoring and correcting nonprofessional behavior; compose a plan to evaluate and hold students accountable for their professionalism.

METHODOLOGY: This workshop, through interactive case scenarios, questions and answers, discussion, and brainstorming, will result in and provide suggestions for solutions to problems on student professionalism.

RESULTS: As medical educators, our role must be to facilitate the acquisitions of professionalism, in addition to learning clinical medicine. This includes education on ethics, respect of patients, responsibility and commitment to the profession, reflection, and selfawareness. The manners in which these are implemented vary among programs, each struggling to define and measure this quality. This presentation will serve to evaluate various methods of assessing and evaluating professionalism in students with the anticipation of finding the concepts necessary to foster the development of professional behaviors. The 15-minute introduction will provide a short background on recent literature related to professionalism amongst health care students. In addition, a general list of characteristics of professionalism that are expected and the common issues related to nonprofessional behavior will be presented. The 60-minute discussion period will be composed of eliciting information from the audience related to various methods of evaluating and monitoring professionalism. In addition, the facilitators will distribute samples of various tools that are being utilized in physician assistant and medical school programs. These assessments will be compared and contrasted. In addition, the audience will also be asked to discuss how nonprofessional behavior is addressed in their programs. Throughout the discussion, the facilitators will be recording key points. The facilitators will then spend 15 minutes summarizing the discussions, highlighting the key points of discussion. These key points will be brought together to construct a plan to evaluate and monitor professionalism in students.

CONCLUSIONS: With the changing trend in student demographics, many health care educators struggle to monitor and enforce professional behavior in students. We will discuss common issues related to professionalism in regard to student behaviors. The audience will participate by sharing their ideas, situations, and policies while composing a plan to evaluate and hold students accountable for their professionalism.