Event Title

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF USING GLENOHUMERAL JOINT TOTAL ROTATIONAL RANGE OF MOTION MEASUREMENTS TO GUIDE INJURY PREVENTION INTERVENTIONS

Location

Terry Auditorium

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Purpose/Hypothesis. Upper extremity injuries in softball have been shown to account for 33% of all injuries in softball in NCAA athletes. Glenohumeral joint micro instability and total rotational range of motion deficits (TRROM-d) are associated with shoulder and elbow injuries in overhead athletes from high school through professional. The effects of targeted interventions addressing impairments in the shoulders of NCAA softball players was retrospectively explored. Materials/Methods. 25 different softball players were measured over 2 consecutive competitive seasons (2013-2014 and 2014-2015), accounting for a total of 35 player-seasons. Prior to the start of each season, bilateral glenohumeral joint total rotational range of motion measurements (TRROM) and Functional Movement Screen shoulder mobility test (FMS-SMT) scores were recorded. Student-athletes were divided into three groups; A mobility deficit group (MDG, N = 16, TRROM-d > 10% of the TRROM of the non-dominant shoulder or TRROM < 170° or a score of one on the FMS-SMT), A hypermobility group (HG, n = 13, dominant arm glenohumeral TRROM > 180°), non-intervention group (NG, n = 7, TRROM 170°-180°, normal FMS-SMT). Before each practice and game the MDG performed stretching and mobility interventions for the glenohumeral joint and thoracic region and the HG performed band resisted exercises for the rotator cuff and scapular musculature. Results. No upper extremity injuries occurred over the two competitive seasons vs. 25 injuries over the two consecutive years prior. Conclusions. Injury prevention measures designed to address specific impairments in collegiate softball players may reduce injury rates

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF USING GLENOHUMERAL JOINT TOTAL ROTATIONAL RANGE OF MOTION MEASUREMENTS TO GUIDE INJURY PREVENTION INTERVENTIONS

Terry Auditorium

Purpose/Hypothesis. Upper extremity injuries in softball have been shown to account for 33% of all injuries in softball in NCAA athletes. Glenohumeral joint micro instability and total rotational range of motion deficits (TRROM-d) are associated with shoulder and elbow injuries in overhead athletes from high school through professional. The effects of targeted interventions addressing impairments in the shoulders of NCAA softball players was retrospectively explored. Materials/Methods. 25 different softball players were measured over 2 consecutive competitive seasons (2013-2014 and 2014-2015), accounting for a total of 35 player-seasons. Prior to the start of each season, bilateral glenohumeral joint total rotational range of motion measurements (TRROM) and Functional Movement Screen shoulder mobility test (FMS-SMT) scores were recorded. Student-athletes were divided into three groups; A mobility deficit group (MDG, N = 16, TRROM-d > 10% of the TRROM of the non-dominant shoulder or TRROM < 170° or a score of one on the FMS-SMT), A hypermobility group (HG, n = 13, dominant arm glenohumeral TRROM > 180°), non-intervention group (NG, n = 7, TRROM 170°-180°, normal FMS-SMT). Before each practice and game the MDG performed stretching and mobility interventions for the glenohumeral joint and thoracic region and the HG performed band resisted exercises for the rotator cuff and scapular musculature. Results. No upper extremity injuries occurred over the two competitive seasons vs. 25 injuries over the two consecutive years prior. Conclusions. Injury prevention measures designed to address specific impairments in collegiate softball players may reduce injury rates