Presentation Title

QUICK CONTRAST SENSITIVITY FUNCTION TESTING IN ADULTS WITHOUT OCULAR DISEASE

Location

Hull Auditorium

Format

Event

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. We sought to determine the reliability and range of normative results for quick contrast sensitivity function (qCSF) testing in adults. Background. Contrast sensitivity declines with aging and previously validated tests can produce highly variable results across and within individuals. A new test (qCSF) provides rapid assessment of contrast across various spatial frequencies to determine the area under the curve (AUC), but the typical range of responses has not yet been established. Methods. Contrast sensitivity declines with aging and previously validated tests can produce highly variable results across and within individuals. A new test (qCSF) provides rapid assessment of contrast across various spatial frequencies to determine the area under the curve (AUC), but the typical range of responses has not yet been established. Results. Compared to subjects aged 20-49 years (mean AUC 1.99, 1.68 or 1.06 for qCSF testing binocularly or with the better eye, respectively), 8 participants between the ages of 50-69 had statistically significantly reduced AUC measures (mean 1.68, 1.44 or 0.90), and those aged 70-89 had an even further statistically significant reduction (mean 1.37, 1.17 or 0.55). Contrast reductions according to age were found across all spatial frequencies but were most apparent at higher spatial frequencies. Subjects aged 20-49 had a slightly lower mean test-retest coefficient of variation than older subjects > 50 years when testing binocularly (4% vs. 9%; p=0.0001), monocularly with the better eye (7% vs. 12%; p=0.047) or with the filter (9% vs. 19%; p=0.02). Conclusion. An age related decline in qCSF occurred in the 5th decade of life, with a further decline among people in their 70’s. The qCSF test can provide reliable results across younger and older adults with normal vision. Grants. NIH R21 EY023720; Adaptive Sensory Technology

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

QUICK CONTRAST SENSITIVITY FUNCTION TESTING IN ADULTS WITHOUT OCULAR DISEASE

Hull Auditorium

Objective. We sought to determine the reliability and range of normative results for quick contrast sensitivity function (qCSF) testing in adults. Background. Contrast sensitivity declines with aging and previously validated tests can produce highly variable results across and within individuals. A new test (qCSF) provides rapid assessment of contrast across various spatial frequencies to determine the area under the curve (AUC), but the typical range of responses has not yet been established. Methods. Contrast sensitivity declines with aging and previously validated tests can produce highly variable results across and within individuals. A new test (qCSF) provides rapid assessment of contrast across various spatial frequencies to determine the area under the curve (AUC), but the typical range of responses has not yet been established. Results. Compared to subjects aged 20-49 years (mean AUC 1.99, 1.68 or 1.06 for qCSF testing binocularly or with the better eye, respectively), 8 participants between the ages of 50-69 had statistically significantly reduced AUC measures (mean 1.68, 1.44 or 0.90), and those aged 70-89 had an even further statistically significant reduction (mean 1.37, 1.17 or 0.55). Contrast reductions according to age were found across all spatial frequencies but were most apparent at higher spatial frequencies. Subjects aged 20-49 had a slightly lower mean test-retest coefficient of variation than older subjects > 50 years when testing binocularly (4% vs. 9%; p=0.0001), monocularly with the better eye (7% vs. 12%; p=0.047) or with the filter (9% vs. 19%; p=0.02). Conclusion. An age related decline in qCSF occurred in the 5th decade of life, with a further decline among people in their 70’s. The qCSF test can provide reliable results across younger and older adults with normal vision. Grants. NIH R21 EY023720; Adaptive Sensory Technology