Event Title

KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING AMONG A COHORT OF PATIENTS AND PRESCRIBERS: DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION THEORY

Location

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Start Date

12-2-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Objectives. This study aims to test Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation theory on adoption of pharmacogenetics testing. Background. Healthcare providers play a key role in patient health care, their knowledge and attitudes may play a critical role in the incorporation of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing and therapy into routine practice and that will contribute to improvement in health outcomes. Equally important, are the knowledge and attitudes of patients who will also determine the rate of diffusion and adoption of PGx testing. Although pharmacogenetics has the potential to improve drug safety and efficacy, its acceptance in medical practice is limited. Method. The study protocol will be submitted and approved through NSU’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). Patients 18 years or older who are receiving simvastatin and/or clopidogrel will be offered PGx testing via buccal swab. Patients will also be invited to participate in an online survey. Physicians prescribing and monitoring medication therapy for potential study participants will be included in the study to determine their knowledge and attitudes toward PGx testing. A survey questionnaire based on Rogers’ theory will collects data on demographics, knowledge and attitudes. Results. Although results for this particular study are not complete yet, previous and current studies have found that nearly 10% of physicians in the United States believe they have the adequate training and education required to use PGx testing. Some studies indicated physicians’ positive attitude toward this new technology. Initial results from previous studies suggest that younger patients and higher educated patients were more likely to accept PGx testing and were eager to see how this new technology might help with their health outcomes. Conclusion. Numerous studies reported several barriers to the diffusion of Pharmacogenetics. Future studies are needed to have a better understanding of decision-making process towards PGx testing. Grants. This study will be funded by a grant from NSU/ Research Grant Program.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING AMONG A COHORT OF PATIENTS AND PRESCRIBERS: DIFFUSION OF INNOVATION THEORY

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Objectives. This study aims to test Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovation theory on adoption of pharmacogenetics testing. Background. Healthcare providers play a key role in patient health care, their knowledge and attitudes may play a critical role in the incorporation of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing and therapy into routine practice and that will contribute to improvement in health outcomes. Equally important, are the knowledge and attitudes of patients who will also determine the rate of diffusion and adoption of PGx testing. Although pharmacogenetics has the potential to improve drug safety and efficacy, its acceptance in medical practice is limited. Method. The study protocol will be submitted and approved through NSU’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). Patients 18 years or older who are receiving simvastatin and/or clopidogrel will be offered PGx testing via buccal swab. Patients will also be invited to participate in an online survey. Physicians prescribing and monitoring medication therapy for potential study participants will be included in the study to determine their knowledge and attitudes toward PGx testing. A survey questionnaire based on Rogers’ theory will collects data on demographics, knowledge and attitudes. Results. Although results for this particular study are not complete yet, previous and current studies have found that nearly 10% of physicians in the United States believe they have the adequate training and education required to use PGx testing. Some studies indicated physicians’ positive attitude toward this new technology. Initial results from previous studies suggest that younger patients and higher educated patients were more likely to accept PGx testing and were eager to see how this new technology might help with their health outcomes. Conclusion. Numerous studies reported several barriers to the diffusion of Pharmacogenetics. Future studies are needed to have a better understanding of decision-making process towards PGx testing. Grants. This study will be funded by a grant from NSU/ Research Grant Program.