Event Title

Peer to Peer Mentoring of Baccalaureate Student Nurses in the Simulation Lab Setting

Start Date

10-2-2012 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. This teaching learning strategy was conducted to explore the impact of peer mentoring on the reduction of anxiety, and the increase in self-confidence and organizational skills in the simulation lab setting. Background. Earlier research supports the role of the nurse mentor as integral in the preparation of the novice nurse as they develop competent practice behaviors. Methods. Pre simulation experience questionnaires were completed by 55 third semester students (novices) who were asked to identify stressors associated with participation in a high fidelity simulation setting. Three primary themes emerged: high levels of anxiety related to being watched, questionable self confidence levels and concern related organizing care as stressors. Novice student nurses participated in one simulation experience prior to having them partnered with peer mentors (senior student nurses). Senior students were invited to participate to serve as resources for the 3rd semester students on a volunteer basis. The novices and seniors were paired in a second simulation separated by several weeks within one 16 week semester. Data collected from the novices on their experience with and without mentors serves to further the understanding of how peer mentoring impacts the stressors of novice nurses in the simulation setting. No control group was formed where novices were not paired in the second simulation Results. Students completed the standard simulation evaluation forms. Conclusion. Students felt that the teaching learning strategy increased self-confidence and reduced their anxiety. Grants. No grant funding was obtained for this project.

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Feb 10th, 12:00 AM

Peer to Peer Mentoring of Baccalaureate Student Nurses in the Simulation Lab Setting

Objective. This teaching learning strategy was conducted to explore the impact of peer mentoring on the reduction of anxiety, and the increase in self-confidence and organizational skills in the simulation lab setting. Background. Earlier research supports the role of the nurse mentor as integral in the preparation of the novice nurse as they develop competent practice behaviors. Methods. Pre simulation experience questionnaires were completed by 55 third semester students (novices) who were asked to identify stressors associated with participation in a high fidelity simulation setting. Three primary themes emerged: high levels of anxiety related to being watched, questionable self confidence levels and concern related organizing care as stressors. Novice student nurses participated in one simulation experience prior to having them partnered with peer mentors (senior student nurses). Senior students were invited to participate to serve as resources for the 3rd semester students on a volunteer basis. The novices and seniors were paired in a second simulation separated by several weeks within one 16 week semester. Data collected from the novices on their experience with and without mentors serves to further the understanding of how peer mentoring impacts the stressors of novice nurses in the simulation setting. No control group was formed where novices were not paired in the second simulation Results. Students completed the standard simulation evaluation forms. Conclusion. Students felt that the teaching learning strategy increased self-confidence and reduced their anxiety. Grants. No grant funding was obtained for this project.