Event Title

Evaluation of the Business and Leadership Components of an RN to BSN Nursing Program

Start Date

10-2-2012 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. This study was conducted to evaluate the business and leadership components of a Registered Nursing (RN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program and determine if the best practices in business and leadership were current, applicable, and relevant in the current RN-to-BSN curriculum. Background. Today’s nursing leaders are challenged by a rapidly changing health care environment that includes changes in technology, demographics, workforce diversity, fiscal management, rules and regulations, consumer demands, globalization of economics and politics, and changing health care reimbursement systems. To meet these challenges, strong nursing leadership is needed along with competent skills in business and leadership principles. The development of these skills is essential in positioning baccalaureate nurses as decision makers who are credible and valued members of interprofessional health delivery systems team. Prior to this study, the nursing department had not formally evaluated the business and leadership components of the RN to BSN program. Methods. An evaluation methodology to assess the business and leadership components of an RN-to-BSN nursing program was utilized. An evaluation tool was developed and used to compare expected outcomes (criteria) of current practices to expected outcomes (criteria) of best practices in the field of nursing. The expected outcomes (criteria) of current best practices were developed from a review of the literature, data collected from RN-to-BSN alumni students, and input from formative and summative committees. Thirteen 38 specific procedures guided the study to assess the value, merit, and worth of the program and answered six research questions. Results. The final evaluation was in the form of an analysis of themes. The final evaluation by an expert panel revealed that the current best practices taught in business and leadership courses were not current with preferred best practices. The final evaluation by the expert panel identified gaps in 10 of 11 criteria measured, between the current best practices taught in NUR 4020 and NUR 4030 of the RN-to-BSN program and the preferred best practices from the literature, practice, student surveys, and the formative and summative committee members. Conclusion. Conclusions from the final evaluations by the experts determined that the business and leadership courses were sound core courses that should be continued in the current RN-to-BSN program. Based on the gaps found in each of the categories and subsequent recommendations from the experts, the decision to update the courses was made to nursing administration. Grants. None

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Feb 10th, 12:00 AM

Evaluation of the Business and Leadership Components of an RN to BSN Nursing Program

Objective. This study was conducted to evaluate the business and leadership components of a Registered Nursing (RN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program and determine if the best practices in business and leadership were current, applicable, and relevant in the current RN-to-BSN curriculum. Background. Today’s nursing leaders are challenged by a rapidly changing health care environment that includes changes in technology, demographics, workforce diversity, fiscal management, rules and regulations, consumer demands, globalization of economics and politics, and changing health care reimbursement systems. To meet these challenges, strong nursing leadership is needed along with competent skills in business and leadership principles. The development of these skills is essential in positioning baccalaureate nurses as decision makers who are credible and valued members of interprofessional health delivery systems team. Prior to this study, the nursing department had not formally evaluated the business and leadership components of the RN to BSN program. Methods. An evaluation methodology to assess the business and leadership components of an RN-to-BSN nursing program was utilized. An evaluation tool was developed and used to compare expected outcomes (criteria) of current practices to expected outcomes (criteria) of best practices in the field of nursing. The expected outcomes (criteria) of current best practices were developed from a review of the literature, data collected from RN-to-BSN alumni students, and input from formative and summative committees. Thirteen 38 specific procedures guided the study to assess the value, merit, and worth of the program and answered six research questions. Results. The final evaluation was in the form of an analysis of themes. The final evaluation by an expert panel revealed that the current best practices taught in business and leadership courses were not current with preferred best practices. The final evaluation by the expert panel identified gaps in 10 of 11 criteria measured, between the current best practices taught in NUR 4020 and NUR 4030 of the RN-to-BSN program and the preferred best practices from the literature, practice, student surveys, and the formative and summative committee members. Conclusion. Conclusions from the final evaluations by the experts determined that the business and leadership courses were sound core courses that should be continued in the current RN-to-BSN program. Based on the gaps found in each of the categories and subsequent recommendations from the experts, the decision to update the courses was made to nursing administration. Grants. None