Event Title

Young Hispanic Heterosexual Men in South Florida Need HIV Testing, Too!

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. We examined associations between risky sex and attitudes toward HIV testing and actual testing practices among a subsample of 236 YHHM aged 18-30 years who participated in a larger study of HIV testing among Hispanic men in South Florida (N=1,054). Background. In 2002, the CDC reported that only 41% of the U.S. population had been tested for HIV and 25% of people with HIV were unaware of their serostatus. The CDC now recommends offering universal testing for persons aged 13-64 regardless of risk. Young Hispanic heterosexual men (YHHM) are not regularly tested for HIV, although they may be at risk for infection. Identifying risk factors associated with non-testing behaviors might help health care professionals identify barriers and facilitators to testing and increase acceptance of testing by YHHM. Methods. We used a cross-sectional design to report HIV testing practices, attitudes towards testing, sexual behavior, and drug use. We used time-space sampling to recruit participants from community venues in South Florida. Respondents were asked to complete an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire using pen-and-paper format. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0. Results. Only 48% of respondents had been previously tested for HIV. Of those who were tested, 42% reported it was physician-recommended. Of the men who were never tested (52%), only 13% reported they had been offered a test by a physician; 80% said they would get tested if a physician recommended it. YHHM who were tested scored higher on the Pros of HIV Testing Scale than men who were not. YHHM were more likely not to be tested than their older counterparts. Conclusions. YHHM in South Florida are not getting tested for HIV. Public health providers and health professionals have a unique opportunity to encourage YHHM to get tested. More efforts are needed to help providers implement CDC guidelines for universal testing. Grants. HIN.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Young Hispanic Heterosexual Men in South Florida Need HIV Testing, Too!

Objective. We examined associations between risky sex and attitudes toward HIV testing and actual testing practices among a subsample of 236 YHHM aged 18-30 years who participated in a larger study of HIV testing among Hispanic men in South Florida (N=1,054). Background. In 2002, the CDC reported that only 41% of the U.S. population had been tested for HIV and 25% of people with HIV were unaware of their serostatus. The CDC now recommends offering universal testing for persons aged 13-64 regardless of risk. Young Hispanic heterosexual men (YHHM) are not regularly tested for HIV, although they may be at risk for infection. Identifying risk factors associated with non-testing behaviors might help health care professionals identify barriers and facilitators to testing and increase acceptance of testing by YHHM. Methods. We used a cross-sectional design to report HIV testing practices, attitudes towards testing, sexual behavior, and drug use. We used time-space sampling to recruit participants from community venues in South Florida. Respondents were asked to complete an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire using pen-and-paper format. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0. Results. Only 48% of respondents had been previously tested for HIV. Of those who were tested, 42% reported it was physician-recommended. Of the men who were never tested (52%), only 13% reported they had been offered a test by a physician; 80% said they would get tested if a physician recommended it. YHHM who were tested scored higher on the Pros of HIV Testing Scale than men who were not. YHHM were more likely not to be tested than their older counterparts. Conclusions. YHHM in South Florida are not getting tested for HIV. Public health providers and health professionals have a unique opportunity to encourage YHHM to get tested. More efforts are needed to help providers implement CDC guidelines for universal testing. Grants. HIN.