Event Title

Food for Thought Sight

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. To educate adult patrons at Whole Foods Market on the ocular benefits of proper nutrition. Background. Almost half of Americans believe that carrots are the best food choice for their vision. However, green leafy vegetables are actually the best choice. The American Optometric Association has chosen to promote healthy eating habits and the benefits they can have on ocular health. Methods. We spoke to patrons of Whole Foods Market about making healthy food choices that can aid in the prevention of various eye diseases. We provided eye-healthy recipes, shopping lists, and informational brochures. Patrons were asked to complete a survey to evaluate the effectiveness of the educational booth and the impact of the information presented. Results. After polling 104 patrons, awareness was raised from 31.7% to 98.1% in those who would base future purchases on ocular health. The participants found the grocery lists most useful, followed by the one-on-one discussions. Conclusions. The public is willing to change their food purchasing choices when provided with good information in the most impactful place. Eating the right foods now can reduce the risk and may prevent many common eye diseases in the community.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Food for Thought Sight

Objective. To educate adult patrons at Whole Foods Market on the ocular benefits of proper nutrition. Background. Almost half of Americans believe that carrots are the best food choice for their vision. However, green leafy vegetables are actually the best choice. The American Optometric Association has chosen to promote healthy eating habits and the benefits they can have on ocular health. Methods. We spoke to patrons of Whole Foods Market about making healthy food choices that can aid in the prevention of various eye diseases. We provided eye-healthy recipes, shopping lists, and informational brochures. Patrons were asked to complete a survey to evaluate the effectiveness of the educational booth and the impact of the information presented. Results. After polling 104 patrons, awareness was raised from 31.7% to 98.1% in those who would base future purchases on ocular health. The participants found the grocery lists most useful, followed by the one-on-one discussions. Conclusions. The public is willing to change their food purchasing choices when provided with good information in the most impactful place. Eating the right foods now can reduce the risk and may prevent many common eye diseases in the community.