Fischler College of Education: Theses and Dissertations

Date of Award

2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Abraham S. Fischler College of Education

Advisor

Gail M. Johnson

Committee Member

Stacey Jones

Abstract

The researcher designed this quantitative dissertation research to explore the perceptions of beginning nursing students toward professionalism in nursing, specific to professional values within the context of curriculum delivery for a leadership and management course in one baccalaureate nursing program. In addition, the researcher reviewed the literature for defining characteristics of professionalism in nursing. Adult students admitted to nursing programs today create multi-generational cohorts with prior learning from experiences and academic degrees in other disciplines. Often, content on professionalism in nursing is integrated in a nursing curriculum. However, students in a leadership and management course were unable to state the meaning of professionalism in nursing shortly before graduation. This study focused on professional values based on the nursing code of ethics as one attribute of the complex concept of professionalism. This exploratory study analyzed responses of students prior to beginning nursing courses to the Nurses Professional Values Scale-Revised (NPVS-R) survey. Findings indicated that beginning student perceptions of professionalism in nursing specific to professional values were generally in alignment with nursing standards. Significant findings suggested a lack of alignment to professional standards under the themes of trust, activism, caring and professionalism through autonomous practice, self-regulation, and participation professional activities positively associated to five variables. Recommendations are made for enhancing curriculum design of leadership and management in nursing content to address these areas.

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