Title

A Qualitative Study of Women to Assess Copying Mechanisms for Exercise Adherence to Curtail Obesity

Location

DeSantis Room 1048

Format Type

Plenary

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

15-1-2020 4:00 PM

End Date

15-1-2020 4:20 PM

Abstract

A recent interpretative phenomenological analysis sought exploration regarding the research phenomena of continued obesity deterrence in relation to structured exercise adherence in women. This qualitative study explored the personal lived experiences of previously obese women between the ages of 20 to 40, and their current coping mechanisms of exercise adherence in relation to the deterrence of obesity. A 10-question interview was implemented to explore the participants’ successful lived experiences toward the discovery of any commonly shared physiological or psychological factors that substantiate health care adherences.

The study included 11 highly participants, a represented sample of the highly target population. The study sample focused only on a successful deterrence of obesity in women recruited from a Detroit area YMCA. The results demonstrated that predominately negative external physiological and psychological experiences are initially necessary to self-determine or trigger behavioral change, followed by prolonged positive internal psychological motivators needed to maintain adherence to exercise, culminating with the consistency of routine structured regimen to deter obesity.

The results found that a self-policing mechanism was created within each of the women due to three specified variables. The negative trigger initiated the action phase, while the positive motivators along with structured exercise regimen over a prolonged period of time assisted in creating a mindset that would not allow for failure. The positive feelings of improved health, physicality, and mind pattern along with the fear of negative regression was overwhelming enough in all 11 participants to keep them in adherence to their regimen.

Keywords

qualitative, phenomenological, lived, women, experience, obesity, health, study

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Jan 15th, 4:00 PM Jan 15th, 4:20 PM

A Qualitative Study of Women to Assess Copying Mechanisms for Exercise Adherence to Curtail Obesity

DeSantis Room 1048

A recent interpretative phenomenological analysis sought exploration regarding the research phenomena of continued obesity deterrence in relation to structured exercise adherence in women. This qualitative study explored the personal lived experiences of previously obese women between the ages of 20 to 40, and their current coping mechanisms of exercise adherence in relation to the deterrence of obesity. A 10-question interview was implemented to explore the participants’ successful lived experiences toward the discovery of any commonly shared physiological or psychological factors that substantiate health care adherences.

The study included 11 highly participants, a represented sample of the highly target population. The study sample focused only on a successful deterrence of obesity in women recruited from a Detroit area YMCA. The results demonstrated that predominately negative external physiological and psychological experiences are initially necessary to self-determine or trigger behavioral change, followed by prolonged positive internal psychological motivators needed to maintain adherence to exercise, culminating with the consistency of routine structured regimen to deter obesity.

The results found that a self-policing mechanism was created within each of the women due to three specified variables. The negative trigger initiated the action phase, while the positive motivators along with structured exercise regimen over a prolonged period of time assisted in creating a mindset that would not allow for failure. The positive feelings of improved health, physicality, and mind pattern along with the fear of negative regression was overwhelming enough in all 11 participants to keep them in adherence to their regimen.