Title of Project

Cellulitis and Risk Factors for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Collegiate Athlete: A Case Report

Researcher Information

Deirdre Foisy

Project Type

Event

Start Date

7-4-2006 12:00 AM

End Date

7-4-2006 12:00 AM

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COinS
 
Apr 7th, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Cellulitis and Risk Factors for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Collegiate Athlete: A Case Report

Topic: Dermatological condition, presented during pre-season in a collegiate volleyball athlete. The injury manifested into a form of cellulites, with signs of possible Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. Purpose: To present a case study identifying characteristics associated with a potential staphylococcus infection as it relates to a skin lesion.

Friction blisters are common during pre-season athletics, especially during multiple daily practices. The formation of a blister occurs within the upper layers of the epidermis. A space forms between the layers leaving the surface intact and fluid fills the space. Blister formation usually requires thick and immobile epidermis, and forms easily on moist, warm skin. In this case, the athlete presented with a typical friction blister and received standard wound care treatments. However, after weeks of conservative treatment with no resolution, the blister had developed into cellulitis (as diagnosed by a physician). After two months of antibiotic therapy, the cellulitis at the site of the friction blister had not resolved. At this point in the case, MRSA was a concern; however, it is important to note that the presence of MRSA among athletes is rare.

Goal: To demonstrate the importances of proper wound care, and identify the signs of possible MRSA; the occurrence of cellulitis associated with a skin lesion can be an indication of MRSA. The lack of literature regarding MRSA in the athletic population warrants presentation of this information to enhance the awareness of identification of at- risk skin wounds.