Title of Project

Friendships Across The Lifespan

Project Type

Event

Location

Alvin Sherman Library 4009

Start Date

2-4-2004 12:00 AM

End Date

2-4-2004 12:00 AM

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM

Friendships Across The Lifespan

Alvin Sherman Library 4009

During infancy we begin to develop social skills and learn how to deal with the people around us, especially family and friends. During infancy, we develop different types of attachment styles. Studies show that about 70% of infants acquire a secure attachment style, in which the infant uses the mother as a secure base, but ventures off to explore the surroundings. About 10% develop a resistant style, in which the infant remains near their mother but resists physical contact with her and may even hit or kick her. This infant is wary of strangers. Another 15% develop an avoidant style, where the infant is not interested in exploring their surroundings. They are not wary of strangers, but ignore or avoid them just as they do their mothers. A small percentage of the infants develop a fearful or disorganized attachment. This style reflects the infant’s insecurity and confusion about whether to approach or avoid a parent. Many of these infants have been abused or neglected by a parent and does not have strategies to cope with negative emotions and are hesitant to approach their parent. Friendships and relationships are essential to the normal cognitive, social, and emotional development of a person. Hence, it is essential to enjoy a secure bond with at least one caregiver during infancy, a close friendship during childhood and adolescence, and an intimate romantic relationship or friendship in adulthood. These factors not only contribute to a satisfying life, but also our well-being and normal development.