Marine & Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles

Title

Benthic Coral Reef Calcium Carbonate Dissolution in an Acidifying Ocean

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-2014

Publication Title

Nature Climate Change

ISSN

1758-678X

Volume

4

Issue/No.

11

First Page

969

Last Page

976

Abstract

Changes in CaCO3 dissolution due to ocean acidification are potentially more important than changes in calcification to the future accretion and survival of coral reef ecosystems. As most CaCO3 in coral reefs is stored in old permeable sediments, increasing sediment dissolution due to ocean acidification will result in reef loss even if calcification remains unchanged. Previous studies indicate that CaCO3 dissolution could be more sensitive to ocean acidification than calcification by reef organisms. Observed changes in net ecosystem calcification owing to ocean acidification could therefore be due mainly to increased dissolution rather than decreased calcification. In addition, biologically mediated calcification could potentially adapt, at least partially, to future ocean acidification, while dissolution, which is mostly a geochemical response to changes in seawater chemistry, will not adapt. Here, we review the current knowledge of shallow-water CaCO3 dissolution and demonstrate that dissolution in the context of ocean acidification has been largely overlooked compared with calcification.

Comments

©2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

Additional Comments

ARC grant #s: DP110103638, LP100200732; NSF grant #: 12-55042

ORCID ID

0000-0003-3556-7616

DOI

10.1038/nclimate2380

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