Presentation Title

Pharmaceutical Formulations for the Treatment of Preoperative Anxiety in Children

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D. student

College

College of Pharmacy

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-2-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the availability of alternatives to current pharmaceutical formulations specifically designed for treatment of preoperative anxiety in children. Background. Surgical procedures generate high levels of anxiety and stress for children which have resulted in negative behavioral changes and poor treatment outcomes. Sedative drugs are routinely given preoperatively to help minimize the anxiety levels in children prior to surgical procedures. However, these sedative medications are commonly given as liquid formulations that have bitter taste, leading to poor acceptance and challenging administration. Methods. A comprehensive computerized literature search was conducted to evaluate the current and alternative treatment options used for pediatric preoperative anesthesia. The key words “pediatric” and “preoperative anesthesia” were searched within both the US National Library of Medicine (Medline) and PubMed™. In addition, a patent search was conducted using the online United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) database, with the phrase “pediatric preoperative anesthesia” having the Boolean operator “AND” between each expression. Results. It was discovered that there is a scarcity in preoperative anxiety treatment options for pediatrics that are convenient, palatable, rapidly functioning, and child friendly. Current commercially available formulations and treatment options do not allow for easy administration to children. Conclusion. This study will bring a refining contribution to the evaluation of the needs and priorities that support the development of suitable pharmaceutical formulations for pediatric patients in the treatment management of their preoperative anxiety. Grants. Grant Submission to the Health Professions Division Research Grant currently under review.

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Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 4:00 PM

Pharmaceutical Formulations for the Treatment of Preoperative Anxiety in Children

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. To evaluate the availability of alternatives to current pharmaceutical formulations specifically designed for treatment of preoperative anxiety in children. Background. Surgical procedures generate high levels of anxiety and stress for children which have resulted in negative behavioral changes and poor treatment outcomes. Sedative drugs are routinely given preoperatively to help minimize the anxiety levels in children prior to surgical procedures. However, these sedative medications are commonly given as liquid formulations that have bitter taste, leading to poor acceptance and challenging administration. Methods. A comprehensive computerized literature search was conducted to evaluate the current and alternative treatment options used for pediatric preoperative anesthesia. The key words “pediatric” and “preoperative anesthesia” were searched within both the US National Library of Medicine (Medline) and PubMed™. In addition, a patent search was conducted using the online United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) database, with the phrase “pediatric preoperative anesthesia” having the Boolean operator “AND” between each expression. Results. It was discovered that there is a scarcity in preoperative anxiety treatment options for pediatrics that are convenient, palatable, rapidly functioning, and child friendly. Current commercially available formulations and treatment options do not allow for easy administration to children. Conclusion. This study will bring a refining contribution to the evaluation of the needs and priorities that support the development of suitable pharmaceutical formulations for pediatric patients in the treatment management of their preoperative anxiety. Grants. Grant Submission to the Health Professions Division Research Grant currently under review.