Presentation Title

Effect of Prescribed Potassium and Blood Pressure Control Among African Americans in the United States: NHANES Survey 2005-2015

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D. in Pharmacy

Speaker Credentials

PharmD

College

College of Pharmacy

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-2-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

Effect of potassium supplementation and blood pressure (BP) control among Blacks in the United States Objective. To evaluate the relationship of prescribed potassium supplementation and BP control among survey participants self-reporting as Black and having a hypertension. Background. Small published studies have found a negative association between dietary potassium intake and BP control but no large-scale studies have evaluated the relationship of oral potassium supplementation and BP control among the Black population which has a higher prevalence of hypertension. Methods. A cohort study using the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2005 – 2016 will include participants self-reporting as non-Hispanic Black, age between 18-80 years, informed by doctor of hypertension or taking a prescribed medication for BP or a BP measurement of >=140 or 90 mmHg at the time of survey physical examination. Included participants must have a creatinine clearance of >=30ml/min/1.73m2. Exposure is defined as those reporting use of potassium chloride in the past 30 days since survey interview and the main outcome is BP in mmHg. An independent t-test will be used to assess whether the average BP across potassium use or no use is significantly different using an alpha of 5%. Results. Survey participant socio-demographics, insurance coverage status, history of cardiovascular disease, diuretic/ARB/ACEi use, renal status and body mass index will be described along with the statistical association of potassium use and average blood pressure. Conclusion. Evaluating the relationship of potassium supplementation and BP in the Black population will help determine whether it could be an alternative method in managing hypertension.

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Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 4:00 PM

Effect of Prescribed Potassium and Blood Pressure Control Among African Americans in the United States: NHANES Survey 2005-2015

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Effect of potassium supplementation and blood pressure (BP) control among Blacks in the United States Objective. To evaluate the relationship of prescribed potassium supplementation and BP control among survey participants self-reporting as Black and having a hypertension. Background. Small published studies have found a negative association between dietary potassium intake and BP control but no large-scale studies have evaluated the relationship of oral potassium supplementation and BP control among the Black population which has a higher prevalence of hypertension. Methods. A cohort study using the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2005 – 2016 will include participants self-reporting as non-Hispanic Black, age between 18-80 years, informed by doctor of hypertension or taking a prescribed medication for BP or a BP measurement of >=140 or 90 mmHg at the time of survey physical examination. Included participants must have a creatinine clearance of >=30ml/min/1.73m2. Exposure is defined as those reporting use of potassium chloride in the past 30 days since survey interview and the main outcome is BP in mmHg. An independent t-test will be used to assess whether the average BP across potassium use or no use is significantly different using an alpha of 5%. Results. Survey participant socio-demographics, insurance coverage status, history of cardiovascular disease, diuretic/ARB/ACEi use, renal status and body mass index will be described along with the statistical association of potassium use and average blood pressure. Conclusion. Evaluating the relationship of potassium supplementation and BP in the Black population will help determine whether it could be an alternative method in managing hypertension.