Presentation Title

HDAC Inhibitor SAHA Sensitizes Metformin-Induced Cell Death in A2780 Ovarian Cancer Cells

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D. student

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-2-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

HDAC inhibitor SAHA sensitizes Metformin-induced cell death in A2780 ovarian cancer cells Amal Alzahrani1, Ph.D student Theodore Lemuel Mathuram2, Ph.D., Research Associate Appu Rathinavelu1,2, Ph.D., Professor, Executive Director 1College of Pharmacy, 2Rumbaugh-Goodwin Institute for Cancer Research

Objective. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy of metformin in combination with SAHA in ovarian cancer cell line (A2780). Background. Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer among women with the highest mortality rate. The high mortality rate of ovarian cancer is attributed to the fact that most women are diagnosed at an advanced stage with poor survival rate. Recently, many studies have confirmed a profound effect of the known anti-diabetic drug, metformin, on various types of cancer including the ovarian cancer. Our study aims to repurpose metformin, by sensitizing A2780 cells with SAHA (pan-HDAC inhibitor) at lower doses. Methods. For this study, MTT assay was conducted with A2780 cells treated with metformin or SAHA, combination of metformin and SAHA at different doses for 24, 48 h. Western Blotting analysis was conducted to assess the protein expression levels of cytochrome C and p21. Results. Combination of metformin 0.1mM and SAHA 10 µM was able to significantly reduce cell viability after 48 h compared to metformin and SAHA alone. Moreover, the combination of metformin 0.1mM and SAHA 10 µM demonstrated significant upregulation of cytochrome C and p21 levels comparing to metformin and SAHA alone. Conclusion. Our results indicate that the reduction in cell viability, and upregulation of cytochrome C and p21 levels may be due to the sensitizing effect of SAHA to metformin. Grants. This study was funded by the Royal Dames of Cancer Research Inc., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

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Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 4:00 PM

HDAC Inhibitor SAHA Sensitizes Metformin-Induced Cell Death in A2780 Ovarian Cancer Cells

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

HDAC inhibitor SAHA sensitizes Metformin-induced cell death in A2780 ovarian cancer cells Amal Alzahrani1, Ph.D student Theodore Lemuel Mathuram2, Ph.D., Research Associate Appu Rathinavelu1,2, Ph.D., Professor, Executive Director 1College of Pharmacy, 2Rumbaugh-Goodwin Institute for Cancer Research

Objective. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy of metformin in combination with SAHA in ovarian cancer cell line (A2780). Background. Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer among women with the highest mortality rate. The high mortality rate of ovarian cancer is attributed to the fact that most women are diagnosed at an advanced stage with poor survival rate. Recently, many studies have confirmed a profound effect of the known anti-diabetic drug, metformin, on various types of cancer including the ovarian cancer. Our study aims to repurpose metformin, by sensitizing A2780 cells with SAHA (pan-HDAC inhibitor) at lower doses. Methods. For this study, MTT assay was conducted with A2780 cells treated with metformin or SAHA, combination of metformin and SAHA at different doses for 24, 48 h. Western Blotting analysis was conducted to assess the protein expression levels of cytochrome C and p21. Results. Combination of metformin 0.1mM and SAHA 10 µM was able to significantly reduce cell viability after 48 h compared to metformin and SAHA alone. Moreover, the combination of metformin 0.1mM and SAHA 10 µM demonstrated significant upregulation of cytochrome C and p21 levels comparing to metformin and SAHA alone. Conclusion. Our results indicate that the reduction in cell viability, and upregulation of cytochrome C and p21 levels may be due to the sensitizing effect of SAHA to metformin. Grants. This study was funded by the Royal Dames of Cancer Research Inc., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.