Presentation Title

Low Vision Patients' Preferences for Light Intensity and Color Temperature during Near Reading

Speaker Credentials

Assistant Professor

Speaker Credentials

OD

College

College of Optometry

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

21-2-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

Low Vision Patients’ Preferences for Light Intensity and Color Temperature during Near Reading Samantha McIntosh, OD, Assistant Professor, College of Optometry Katherine Green, Assistant Professor, College of Optometry Ava Bittner, Ph.D, Associate Professor Department of Ophthalmology, University of California Los Angeles Objective: To investigate whether lighting preferences for reading were related to inner versus outer retinal degeneration in a heterogeneous low vision (LV) population. Background: While task specific lighting is commonly recommended by low vision practitioners to improve the reading performance of visually impaired individuals, it is not well understood whether LV patients’ preferences for light during near reading are related to retinal disease type and/or severity of visual function loss. Methods: Preferences for brightness and color temperature with the LuxIQ/2 while reading hard copy printed materials were evaluated in office for 43 LV patients. Distance visual acuity (VA), near VA and contrast sensitivity (CS) were assessed. Patients’ ocular disease was categorized according to whether it primarily affected the outer retina versus inner or all retinal layers. Results: When comparing patients with ocular disease affecting the outer retina to those with inner retinal disease, there was no significant difference in preferences for brightness or color temperature. Preference for white light intensity or color temperature was not significantly related to age, gender, distance or near VA. Those with reduced CS were significantly more likely to prefer lower (warmer) color temperature. CS was not significantly related to preference for white light brightness. Conclusions: Patients with reduced CS tended to prefer warmer color temperatures. Demographics, VA, and inner versus outer retinal disease were not significant factors related to white light preferences for reading. Grants: This study was funded by a grant from NSU Health Professions Division

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Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 4:00 PM

Low Vision Patients' Preferences for Light Intensity and Color Temperature during Near Reading

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Low Vision Patients’ Preferences for Light Intensity and Color Temperature during Near Reading Samantha McIntosh, OD, Assistant Professor, College of Optometry Katherine Green, Assistant Professor, College of Optometry Ava Bittner, Ph.D, Associate Professor Department of Ophthalmology, University of California Los Angeles Objective: To investigate whether lighting preferences for reading were related to inner versus outer retinal degeneration in a heterogeneous low vision (LV) population. Background: While task specific lighting is commonly recommended by low vision practitioners to improve the reading performance of visually impaired individuals, it is not well understood whether LV patients’ preferences for light during near reading are related to retinal disease type and/or severity of visual function loss. Methods: Preferences for brightness and color temperature with the LuxIQ/2 while reading hard copy printed materials were evaluated in office for 43 LV patients. Distance visual acuity (VA), near VA and contrast sensitivity (CS) were assessed. Patients’ ocular disease was categorized according to whether it primarily affected the outer retina versus inner or all retinal layers. Results: When comparing patients with ocular disease affecting the outer retina to those with inner retinal disease, there was no significant difference in preferences for brightness or color temperature. Preference for white light intensity or color temperature was not significantly related to age, gender, distance or near VA. Those with reduced CS were significantly more likely to prefer lower (warmer) color temperature. CS was not significantly related to preference for white light brightness. Conclusions: Patients with reduced CS tended to prefer warmer color temperatures. Demographics, VA, and inner versus outer retinal disease were not significant factors related to white light preferences for reading. Grants: This study was funded by a grant from NSU Health Professions Division