Presentation Title

Ecologically Valid, Virtual Reality-Based Multi-Tasking Assessment for Individuals with Neurologic Communication Disorders

Speaker Credentials

Associate Professor

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

College

Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences, Speech-Language Pathology

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

21-2-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

Ecologically Valid, Virtual Reality-Based Multi-Tasking Assessment for Individuals with Neurologic Communication Disorders Aisha Gaziani, BS in SLCD, College of Health Care Sciences Gabriela Flores, BS in SLCD, College of Health Care Sciences Angela Merlino, BS in SLCD, College of Health Care Sciences Jackie Hinckley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, College of Health Care Sciences Objective. The purposes of this project are to 1) review approaches to multi-tasking assessment in neurological communication disorders and 2) develop a virtual reality-based assessment appropriate for those with communication disorders. Background. Multi-tasking is an acknowledged aspect of everyday life according to the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning. Many multi-tasking assessments require mobility in environments like shopping malls or hospitals. Virtual reality is a tool that can overcome the physical barriers experienced by many individuals with neurologic conditions. In addition, no multi-tasking assessments are currently validated for individuals with acquired neurogenic language disorders, such as aphasia. Methods. After a comprehensive review of the literature, we gathered input from clinicians and individuals with aphasia about relevant daily activities associated with multi-tasking. The Cooking Task (Frisch et al, 2012; Craik & Bialystok, 2006) is a valid assessment for those with mild cognitive impairments. We selected this task to explore for a potential application for those with language disorders, and because it could be simulated in a virtual reality environment. Results. We are currently piloting this project and results from our initial pilot participants will soon be available. Conclusion. We believe that a virtual reality-based multi-tasking assessment may be an appropriate clinical tool for those with acquired communication disorders.

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Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 4:00 PM

Ecologically Valid, Virtual Reality-Based Multi-Tasking Assessment for Individuals with Neurologic Communication Disorders

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Ecologically Valid, Virtual Reality-Based Multi-Tasking Assessment for Individuals with Neurologic Communication Disorders Aisha Gaziani, BS in SLCD, College of Health Care Sciences Gabriela Flores, BS in SLCD, College of Health Care Sciences Angela Merlino, BS in SLCD, College of Health Care Sciences Jackie Hinckley, Ph.D., Associate Professor, College of Health Care Sciences Objective. The purposes of this project are to 1) review approaches to multi-tasking assessment in neurological communication disorders and 2) develop a virtual reality-based assessment appropriate for those with communication disorders. Background. Multi-tasking is an acknowledged aspect of everyday life according to the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning. Many multi-tasking assessments require mobility in environments like shopping malls or hospitals. Virtual reality is a tool that can overcome the physical barriers experienced by many individuals with neurologic conditions. In addition, no multi-tasking assessments are currently validated for individuals with acquired neurogenic language disorders, such as aphasia. Methods. After a comprehensive review of the literature, we gathered input from clinicians and individuals with aphasia about relevant daily activities associated with multi-tasking. The Cooking Task (Frisch et al, 2012; Craik & Bialystok, 2006) is a valid assessment for those with mild cognitive impairments. We selected this task to explore for a potential application for those with language disorders, and because it could be simulated in a virtual reality environment. Results. We are currently piloting this project and results from our initial pilot participants will soon be available. Conclusion. We believe that a virtual reality-based multi-tasking assessment may be an appropriate clinical tool for those with acquired communication disorders.