Presentation Title

Stay Connected With Your Baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

Speaker Credentials

Associate Professor

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

College

College of Nursing

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

16-2-2018 12:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 1:15 PM

Abstract

Objective: To introduce Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC), also known as Kangaroo Care, which is the method of holding an infant in an upright and prone position, skin-to-skin, on the parent’s chest for a length of time. Blankets or clothing are wrapped around the infant to provide security, similar to a kangaroo pouch (Skin to Skin, 2016). This life-saving nursing intervention within the NICU promotes infant well-being and enhances positive infant outcomes. Background: Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC) is a beneficial holistic nursing care provision for sick or preterm infants requiring hospitalization in NICU. Healthcare research reports many stabilizing benefits to include regulation of physiological responses (Skin to Skin, 2016). Despite all the evidence based research confirming that SSC significantly benefits the newborn, there are multiple barriers to nurses implementing SSC in the NICU. Results: The preterm infant benefits from this intervention with positive outcomes such as regulation of heart rate and respirations; temperature; sleep; irritability and immune system. In addition, it shortens neonatal length of hospital stay, reduces morbidity, improves tolerance to pain, and improves body weight and physical growth. Notably, nursing students identified an innovative product, called the BabyBe System, which simulates SSC for the neonate when NICU nurses and parents cannot provide sustained SSC. The BabyBe device is a bionic gel mattress that allows the baby to feel their caregiver’s breathing, heartbeat, and even voice or music although they are not present. Conclusion: Overall, the review of literature on Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC) supports the identified evidence-based guideline promoting SSC. The benefits for the high-risk infants, and infants receiving palliative care in the NICU, far outweigh the risks according to research literature and various clinical barriers to integration of this holistic nursing care must be overcome. The BabyBe System, an innovative and effective simulation of SSC for the infant, is recommended for use in the United States.

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Feb 16th, 12:15 PM Feb 16th, 1:15 PM

Stay Connected With Your Baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective: To introduce Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC), also known as Kangaroo Care, which is the method of holding an infant in an upright and prone position, skin-to-skin, on the parent’s chest for a length of time. Blankets or clothing are wrapped around the infant to provide security, similar to a kangaroo pouch (Skin to Skin, 2016). This life-saving nursing intervention within the NICU promotes infant well-being and enhances positive infant outcomes. Background: Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC) is a beneficial holistic nursing care provision for sick or preterm infants requiring hospitalization in NICU. Healthcare research reports many stabilizing benefits to include regulation of physiological responses (Skin to Skin, 2016). Despite all the evidence based research confirming that SSC significantly benefits the newborn, there are multiple barriers to nurses implementing SSC in the NICU. Results: The preterm infant benefits from this intervention with positive outcomes such as regulation of heart rate and respirations; temperature; sleep; irritability and immune system. In addition, it shortens neonatal length of hospital stay, reduces morbidity, improves tolerance to pain, and improves body weight and physical growth. Notably, nursing students identified an innovative product, called the BabyBe System, which simulates SSC for the neonate when NICU nurses and parents cannot provide sustained SSC. The BabyBe device is a bionic gel mattress that allows the baby to feel their caregiver’s breathing, heartbeat, and even voice or music although they are not present. Conclusion: Overall, the review of literature on Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC) supports the identified evidence-based guideline promoting SSC. The benefits for the high-risk infants, and infants receiving palliative care in the NICU, far outweigh the risks according to research literature and various clinical barriers to integration of this holistic nursing care must be overcome. The BabyBe System, an innovative and effective simulation of SSC for the infant, is recommended for use in the United States.