Presentation Title

Improving Critical Thinking in Nursing Students

Speaker Credentials

Assistant Professor

Speaker Credentials

Ed.D.

College

College of Nursing

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

16-2-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 2:45 PM

Abstract

Objective. This study was designed to examine developing critical thinking processes in beginning nursing students and discover the preferred practices educators use to promote critical thinking development. Background. Researchers and educators agree critical thinking processes affect many facets of nursing and determine development of critical thinking processes begin early in nursing curricula. These facets include decision-making processes at point of care, evidence-based practice, positive work environments, increased retention rates and work performance, and patient outcomes. Method. For this study, a qualitative, single-embedded exploratory case study design for an intensive analysis of the perceptions of preferred practices in developing critical thinking processes in nursing students was utilized. Constructivism was used as the theoretical framework. Data was collected through focus group interviews. Results. The participants concurred that their preferred practices to develop critical thinking were case studies, concept maps, and simulations. In the literature review, researchers determined debating, gaming, group activities, presentations, questioning, and reflecting as best practices to develop critical thinking processes, in addition to case studies, concept maps, and simulations. Two unexpected discussions occurred in the faculty focus group session. First, faculty were discussing standardized examination questions to evaluate critical thinking processes. The second unexpected discussion was regarding how critical thinking is defined. Conclusion. According to these results, active, student-centered learning experiences improve critical thinking. These experiences should begin when the student first enters the nursing program. Grants. None.

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Feb 16th, 2:15 PM Feb 16th, 2:45 PM

Improving Critical Thinking in Nursing Students

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. This study was designed to examine developing critical thinking processes in beginning nursing students and discover the preferred practices educators use to promote critical thinking development. Background. Researchers and educators agree critical thinking processes affect many facets of nursing and determine development of critical thinking processes begin early in nursing curricula. These facets include decision-making processes at point of care, evidence-based practice, positive work environments, increased retention rates and work performance, and patient outcomes. Method. For this study, a qualitative, single-embedded exploratory case study design for an intensive analysis of the perceptions of preferred practices in developing critical thinking processes in nursing students was utilized. Constructivism was used as the theoretical framework. Data was collected through focus group interviews. Results. The participants concurred that their preferred practices to develop critical thinking were case studies, concept maps, and simulations. In the literature review, researchers determined debating, gaming, group activities, presentations, questioning, and reflecting as best practices to develop critical thinking processes, in addition to case studies, concept maps, and simulations. Two unexpected discussions occurred in the faculty focus group session. First, faculty were discussing standardized examination questions to evaluate critical thinking processes. The second unexpected discussion was regarding how critical thinking is defined. Conclusion. According to these results, active, student-centered learning experiences improve critical thinking. These experiences should begin when the student first enters the nursing program. Grants. None.