Presentation Title

Adolescents’ Perceptions of School Safety: An Ethnographic Approach

Speaker Credentials

Associate Professor

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

College

College of Nursing

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

16-2-2018 1:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 1:45 PM

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the results of focus group discussions held with older adolescents’ in high schools to explore their perceptions of school safety. Protective factors in the school environment have been conceptualized as countering adolescent exposure to risk and enhancing the experience of protection. Background: School violence, teasing and bullying have been identified as serious problems affecting a significant proportion of American youth (Stevens, Lynm, & Glass, 2001). Addressing problems of violence in schools traditionally include skills-building prevention, although researchers are increasingly recognizing the importance of the interaction between individuals and their environments. Methods: Focus groups were conducted in a southwest Florida urban city including high school juniors and seniors in seven high schools. The transcripts were coded and analyzed using Ethnograph software (Qualis Research, 2000) and themes were reported, in order of frequency. Results: The sample included a total of 66 adolescent participants that were 17 to 19 years old who volunteered to participate in this study. The most frequently reported themes related to school protective factors will be reviewed and examples of student quotes from transcripts will provide support for the themes identified. Conclusion: Focus groups provided a means for adolescents to express their views about social relationships with peer groups, friends, teachers and school administrators that are protective, even when exposed to school teasing, bullying on a daily basis. These protective factors in the school setting that are perceived as protective has relevance for the development of school programs that incorporate school protective factors to decrease negative adolescent outcomes. Grants: This study was partially funded by the Safe Schools/Health Students National Grant.

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Feb 16th, 1:15 PM Feb 16th, 1:45 PM

Adolescents’ Perceptions of School Safety: An Ethnographic Approach

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the results of focus group discussions held with older adolescents’ in high schools to explore their perceptions of school safety. Protective factors in the school environment have been conceptualized as countering adolescent exposure to risk and enhancing the experience of protection. Background: School violence, teasing and bullying have been identified as serious problems affecting a significant proportion of American youth (Stevens, Lynm, & Glass, 2001). Addressing problems of violence in schools traditionally include skills-building prevention, although researchers are increasingly recognizing the importance of the interaction between individuals and their environments. Methods: Focus groups were conducted in a southwest Florida urban city including high school juniors and seniors in seven high schools. The transcripts were coded and analyzed using Ethnograph software (Qualis Research, 2000) and themes were reported, in order of frequency. Results: The sample included a total of 66 adolescent participants that were 17 to 19 years old who volunteered to participate in this study. The most frequently reported themes related to school protective factors will be reviewed and examples of student quotes from transcripts will provide support for the themes identified. Conclusion: Focus groups provided a means for adolescents to express their views about social relationships with peer groups, friends, teachers and school administrators that are protective, even when exposed to school teasing, bullying on a daily basis. These protective factors in the school setting that are perceived as protective has relevance for the development of school programs that incorporate school protective factors to decrease negative adolescent outcomes. Grants: This study was partially funded by the Safe Schools/Health Students National Grant.