Presentation Title

Evaluating Barriers During Pharmacy-Led Transition of Care (TOC) to Patients in the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Adherence Outreach, Transitions of Care and Medication Therapy Management (ATM) Center

Speaker Credentials

P4

College

College of Pharmacy

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

16-2-2018 12:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 1:15 PM

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate barriers in pharmacist-led TOC. Background: Prior studies have shown barriers that impede pharmacists’ role in TOC; however this data is limited in the outpatient setting. This is especially evident when it comes to pharmacist-physician interaction and patient acceptance. A previous study demonstrated that overcoming these obstacles can decrease readmissions and medication errors, while improving the patient's understanding of their medications. Methods: A retrospective observational study will be completed to evaluate TOC calls performed by pharmacy interns at the ATM Center using REDCap. The ATM center is notified by the physician of a patient discharge. The pharmacy intern calls the patient to perform a medication reconciliation, provide active patient counseling, a clinical medication review and confirm a scheduled follow up appointment with their primary care doctor. The call is documented within REDCap and if an intervention is made, the recommendation is documented in the patients’ electronic medical record and assigned to the physician. Results: Pending data collection and conclusion.

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Feb 16th, 12:15 PM Feb 16th, 1:15 PM

Evaluating Barriers During Pharmacy-Led Transition of Care (TOC) to Patients in the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Adherence Outreach, Transitions of Care and Medication Therapy Management (ATM) Center

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective: To evaluate barriers in pharmacist-led TOC. Background: Prior studies have shown barriers that impede pharmacists’ role in TOC; however this data is limited in the outpatient setting. This is especially evident when it comes to pharmacist-physician interaction and patient acceptance. A previous study demonstrated that overcoming these obstacles can decrease readmissions and medication errors, while improving the patient's understanding of their medications. Methods: A retrospective observational study will be completed to evaluate TOC calls performed by pharmacy interns at the ATM Center using REDCap. The ATM center is notified by the physician of a patient discharge. The pharmacy intern calls the patient to perform a medication reconciliation, provide active patient counseling, a clinical medication review and confirm a scheduled follow up appointment with their primary care doctor. The call is documented within REDCap and if an intervention is made, the recommendation is documented in the patients’ electronic medical record and assigned to the physician. Results: Pending data collection and conclusion.