Presentation Title

Gait Pathomechanics as Differentiators of Performance in Collegiate Distance Runners

Speaker Credentials

BS-ESS

College

Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences, Bachelor of Science, Exercise and Sport Science

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

16-2-2018 12:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 1:15 PM

Abstract

Objective. This study was conducted to determine if lower extremity running gait pathomechanics could differentiate between high and low performing collegiate distance runners. Background. Faulty running biomechanics such as excessive hip adduction (HADD), hip internal rotation (HIR), counter pelvis drop (CPD), and rearfoot eversion (REV) have been associated with musculoskeletal injury. Their role in performance is poorly understood. Methods. Two top-performers (TP) and two bottom-performers (BP) from both men’s and women’s university cross-country teams were studied, [males (TP; 20.5+0.7 yrs, 64.6+3.5 kg, 1.77+0.1 m) (BP; 18.5+0.7 yrs, 57.5+.6 kg, 1.82+0.0 m)], [females (TP; 18.0+0.0 yrs, 59.45+4.6 kg, 1.67+0.0 m) (BP; 18.0+0.0 yrs, 57.8+4.1 kg, 1.68+0.1 m)]. They were identified by reviewing five NCAA races (5k – 10k) for consistent performance (Fall season 2017). Participants underwent a 3D analysis using a 10-camera motion capture system while running on an instrumented treadmill (2.4-4.0 m/s) during their pre-participation examination. Right leg peak excursion of HADD, HIR, CPD and REV were calculated using Nexus software (ver. 2.7) and compared between TP and BP. Results. BP males had greater peak HADD (10.9+2.5 vs. 6.2+5.20), HIR (23.6+1.8 vs. 10.7+11.00), CPD (5.7+1.3 vs. 4.8+0.80), and REV (13.7+0.0 vs. 7.9+0.00) than TP. BP females had greater HIR than TP, 22.1+4.9 vs 13.5+1.10, respectively. Conclusion. Running pathomechanics, as defined as excessive hip, pelvis, and rearfoot motion may differentiate between running performance, particularly in males. Coaches may use these results to promote proper running mechanics to not only reduce injury risk but to improve performance. Grants. This study was not funded.

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Feb 16th, 12:15 PM Feb 16th, 1:15 PM

Gait Pathomechanics as Differentiators of Performance in Collegiate Distance Runners

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. This study was conducted to determine if lower extremity running gait pathomechanics could differentiate between high and low performing collegiate distance runners. Background. Faulty running biomechanics such as excessive hip adduction (HADD), hip internal rotation (HIR), counter pelvis drop (CPD), and rearfoot eversion (REV) have been associated with musculoskeletal injury. Their role in performance is poorly understood. Methods. Two top-performers (TP) and two bottom-performers (BP) from both men’s and women’s university cross-country teams were studied, [males (TP; 20.5+0.7 yrs, 64.6+3.5 kg, 1.77+0.1 m) (BP; 18.5+0.7 yrs, 57.5+.6 kg, 1.82+0.0 m)], [females (TP; 18.0+0.0 yrs, 59.45+4.6 kg, 1.67+0.0 m) (BP; 18.0+0.0 yrs, 57.8+4.1 kg, 1.68+0.1 m)]. They were identified by reviewing five NCAA races (5k – 10k) for consistent performance (Fall season 2017). Participants underwent a 3D analysis using a 10-camera motion capture system while running on an instrumented treadmill (2.4-4.0 m/s) during their pre-participation examination. Right leg peak excursion of HADD, HIR, CPD and REV were calculated using Nexus software (ver. 2.7) and compared between TP and BP. Results. BP males had greater peak HADD (10.9+2.5 vs. 6.2+5.20), HIR (23.6+1.8 vs. 10.7+11.00), CPD (5.7+1.3 vs. 4.8+0.80), and REV (13.7+0.0 vs. 7.9+0.00) than TP. BP females had greater HIR than TP, 22.1+4.9 vs 13.5+1.10, respectively. Conclusion. Running pathomechanics, as defined as excessive hip, pelvis, and rearfoot motion may differentiate between running performance, particularly in males. Coaches may use these results to promote proper running mechanics to not only reduce injury risk but to improve performance. Grants. This study was not funded.