Presentation Title

Marital Status, Treatment Choice, and Insurance Type Impact on the Treatment Outcome of Patients with Colorectal Cancer

Speaker Credentials

OMS-III

Speaker Credentials

DO

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. Does marital status and insurance type influence treatment outcome? Background. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of death in the Western world. Colon cancer is more common in those over 50 and its risk increases with age, but if it is caught in an early stage, it is often curable. This type of cancer can take many years to develop so that is why early detection with screening greatly improves the chances of a cure. Methods. We analyzed 9186 incident cases of colorectal cancers with papillary adenoma or adenocarcinomas in a localized stage, between January 1st 1995 and December 31st 2002. The association between treatment outcome (death vs alive) and treatment (surgery vs. surgery+adjuvant therapy) was analyzed using a stratified Mantel-Haenszel methodology, the stratum specific relative risks and their corresponding 95% CI being calculated and compared. Results. The single/divorced/widowed patients who underwent surgery alone were twice more likely to die than the patients who underwent surgery+adjuvants for a colorectal cancer in a localized stage and papillary adenoma or adenocarcinoma, adjusting for Medicare insured patients. Individuals who are single, divorced, or widowed showed an increased risk of death if adjuvant treatment was not used. Conclusion. The cancer registry data shows an overwhelming need for adjuvant therapy in this specific situation. Programs to inform health care workers and patients are a possibility. It would be helpful to know how many of the individuals who do undergo adjuvant therapy do not do so due to the unavailability of resources. Grants and Acknowledgement. This study was funded in part through the HPD Research Grant for Florida Cancer Registry Analysis, 2004-2007. The views expressed herein are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of FCDS, the contractor of FL-DOH.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Marital Status, Treatment Choice, and Insurance Type Impact on the Treatment Outcome of Patients with Colorectal Cancer

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. Does marital status and insurance type influence treatment outcome? Background. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of death in the Western world. Colon cancer is more common in those over 50 and its risk increases with age, but if it is caught in an early stage, it is often curable. This type of cancer can take many years to develop so that is why early detection with screening greatly improves the chances of a cure. Methods. We analyzed 9186 incident cases of colorectal cancers with papillary adenoma or adenocarcinomas in a localized stage, between January 1st 1995 and December 31st 2002. The association between treatment outcome (death vs alive) and treatment (surgery vs. surgery+adjuvant therapy) was analyzed using a stratified Mantel-Haenszel methodology, the stratum specific relative risks and their corresponding 95% CI being calculated and compared. Results. The single/divorced/widowed patients who underwent surgery alone were twice more likely to die than the patients who underwent surgery+adjuvants for a colorectal cancer in a localized stage and papillary adenoma or adenocarcinoma, adjusting for Medicare insured patients. Individuals who are single, divorced, or widowed showed an increased risk of death if adjuvant treatment was not used. Conclusion. The cancer registry data shows an overwhelming need for adjuvant therapy in this specific situation. Programs to inform health care workers and patients are a possibility. It would be helpful to know how many of the individuals who do undergo adjuvant therapy do not do so due to the unavailability of resources. Grants and Acknowledgement. This study was funded in part through the HPD Research Grant for Florida Cancer Registry Analysis, 2004-2007. The views expressed herein are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of FCDS, the contractor of FL-DOH.