Presentation Title

Emergency Preparedness Training Needs for Children with Autism

Speaker Credentials

OD-4

Speaker Credentials

MD

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objectives. 1. Explore disaster preparedness education needs among parents or primary caretakers of children with autism 2. Develop and implement an education/training program for parents or primary caretakers of children with autism 3. Evaluate the education/training program. Background. Recent disasters have highlighted the importance of emergency preparedness and have shown gaps in addressing special needs populations. Children with autism spectrum disorders are a particular vulnerable group and face special challenges in emergency situations. Methods. A survey and semi-structural interviews were used to collect data from parents/caregivers of children from the Baudhuin School program. Survey data were analyzed using statistical software (SPSS). Analysis included descriptive statistics (means, ranges and frequencies) of demographic information and frequencies of survey responses. Interviews with parents/caregivers were recorded. Qualitative data analysis was performed using Atlas.ti. Results. The response rate was 43%; 80% of the parents had no previous training in emergency preparedness; 68% did not have a family plan and only 4% felt completely informed about community resources. Only 8% of the parents had involved their child in disaster planning. 78% of the parents were not aware of the schools’ emergency plan. Preferred training format was live training (78% of respondents) provided by autism specialists (81% of respondents). Conclusion. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that there is a need for emergency preparedness education/ training that address the special needs of children with autism. This model was a valid approach to identify important issues related to emergency preparedness for children with autism. Grants and other support. The authors appreciate the support from the Center for Bioterrorism and All-Hazards Preparedness (CBAP) without which, this project would have not been possible. The CBAP is funded, in part, by a grant from the Office of the Assistant secretary of preparedness and response (ASPR) for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. We would like to acknowledge the Baldhuin Preschool at the Mailman Segal Institute for Early Childhood for their participation in this innovative project.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Emergency Preparedness Training Needs for Children with Autism

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objectives. 1. Explore disaster preparedness education needs among parents or primary caretakers of children with autism 2. Develop and implement an education/training program for parents or primary caretakers of children with autism 3. Evaluate the education/training program. Background. Recent disasters have highlighted the importance of emergency preparedness and have shown gaps in addressing special needs populations. Children with autism spectrum disorders are a particular vulnerable group and face special challenges in emergency situations. Methods. A survey and semi-structural interviews were used to collect data from parents/caregivers of children from the Baudhuin School program. Survey data were analyzed using statistical software (SPSS). Analysis included descriptive statistics (means, ranges and frequencies) of demographic information and frequencies of survey responses. Interviews with parents/caregivers were recorded. Qualitative data analysis was performed using Atlas.ti. Results. The response rate was 43%; 80% of the parents had no previous training in emergency preparedness; 68% did not have a family plan and only 4% felt completely informed about community resources. Only 8% of the parents had involved their child in disaster planning. 78% of the parents were not aware of the schools’ emergency plan. Preferred training format was live training (78% of respondents) provided by autism specialists (81% of respondents). Conclusion. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that there is a need for emergency preparedness education/ training that address the special needs of children with autism. This model was a valid approach to identify important issues related to emergency preparedness for children with autism. Grants and other support. The authors appreciate the support from the Center for Bioterrorism and All-Hazards Preparedness (CBAP) without which, this project would have not been possible. The CBAP is funded, in part, by a grant from the Office of the Assistant secretary of preparedness and response (ASPR) for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. We would like to acknowledge the Baldhuin Preschool at the Mailman Segal Institute for Early Childhood for their participation in this innovative project.