Presentation Title

Leisure-Time Physical Activity Levels of the US Workforce

Speaker Credentials

OD-3

Speaker Credentials

MPH

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. Determine the proportion of US workers meeting the Healthy People 2010 Guidelines for leisure-time physical activity levels in major US occupational groups. Background. Physical inactivity and improper nutrition are the primary determinants of the national obesity epidemic. Physical inactivity poses almost as much risk for heart disease as cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol levels, but is more prevalent than any of these other risk factors. Few studies in the US have assessed physical activity levels across worker groups, despite the increasingly sedentary milieu of contemporary US occupations and increasing obesity rates among US workers. Methods. Self-reported leisure-time physical activity was defined as: a) light–moderate activity ≥ 30 min five or more times per week; and/or b) vigorous activity ≥ 20 min three or more times per week. Findings collected on over 150,000 US workers, who participated in the 1997–2004 National Health Interview Surveys, were stratified by occupational group. Results. On average, the proportions of US workers meeting recommended leisure-time physical activity levels were 31% in female and 36% in male US workers. There was substantial variation in the gender-specific rates of leisure-time physical activity levels by occupation (range: 16–55%) with the lowest rates noted in blue collar groups. Conclusion. Leisure-time physical activity levels were sub-optimal among all major US worker groups, with substantial variability across occupations. As part of disease prevention, health professionals should promote increased physical activity levels among those occupations identified with very low rates of leisure-time physical activity. Grants. This study was funded in part through the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (grant # R01 OH03915).

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Leisure-Time Physical Activity Levels of the US Workforce

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. Determine the proportion of US workers meeting the Healthy People 2010 Guidelines for leisure-time physical activity levels in major US occupational groups. Background. Physical inactivity and improper nutrition are the primary determinants of the national obesity epidemic. Physical inactivity poses almost as much risk for heart disease as cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol levels, but is more prevalent than any of these other risk factors. Few studies in the US have assessed physical activity levels across worker groups, despite the increasingly sedentary milieu of contemporary US occupations and increasing obesity rates among US workers. Methods. Self-reported leisure-time physical activity was defined as: a) light–moderate activity ≥ 30 min five or more times per week; and/or b) vigorous activity ≥ 20 min three or more times per week. Findings collected on over 150,000 US workers, who participated in the 1997–2004 National Health Interview Surveys, were stratified by occupational group. Results. On average, the proportions of US workers meeting recommended leisure-time physical activity levels were 31% in female and 36% in male US workers. There was substantial variation in the gender-specific rates of leisure-time physical activity levels by occupation (range: 16–55%) with the lowest rates noted in blue collar groups. Conclusion. Leisure-time physical activity levels were sub-optimal among all major US worker groups, with substantial variability across occupations. As part of disease prevention, health professionals should promote increased physical activity levels among those occupations identified with very low rates of leisure-time physical activity. Grants. This study was funded in part through the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (grant # R01 OH03915).