Presentation Title

Stress Distribution in Maxillary Central Incisor Restored With Different Post Systems

College

College of Dental Medicine

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor restored with different post systems by using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Photoelasticity (PH). Methods. Six bi-dimensional models were created and compared with healthy maxillary incisor (control). The following posts systems were analyzed: carbon fiber, glass fiber, zirconium, stainless steel, titanium and cast metal (Cu-Al alloy). A 100 N load was applied on the palatal surface of the crown at a 45-degree angle to the tooth’s longitudinal axis to simulate tearing function. The stresses were evaluated by determining the von Mises stress distribution and maximum fringe order. Results. The greatest stresses were observed in the middle third of the roots on facial surfaces. The higher stresses concentrations in dentin were created by zirconium, stainless steel, titanium and cast metal post and were nearly the same. The fiber-reinforced posts induced significantly lower stress concentration in dentin compared to metallic and ceramic posts. The stress distribution for fiber-reinforced posts was similar to that recorded in a tooth without post. Conclusion. Results from this study show that the biomimetic behavior of nonmetallic post may reduce the risk of root fracture determining a uniform stress distribution.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Stress Distribution in Maxillary Central Incisor Restored With Different Post Systems

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor restored with different post systems by using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Photoelasticity (PH). Methods. Six bi-dimensional models were created and compared with healthy maxillary incisor (control). The following posts systems were analyzed: carbon fiber, glass fiber, zirconium, stainless steel, titanium and cast metal (Cu-Al alloy). A 100 N load was applied on the palatal surface of the crown at a 45-degree angle to the tooth’s longitudinal axis to simulate tearing function. The stresses were evaluated by determining the von Mises stress distribution and maximum fringe order. Results. The greatest stresses were observed in the middle third of the roots on facial surfaces. The higher stresses concentrations in dentin were created by zirconium, stainless steel, titanium and cast metal post and were nearly the same. The fiber-reinforced posts induced significantly lower stress concentration in dentin compared to metallic and ceramic posts. The stress distribution for fiber-reinforced posts was similar to that recorded in a tooth without post. Conclusion. Results from this study show that the biomimetic behavior of nonmetallic post may reduce the risk of root fracture determining a uniform stress distribution.