Presentation Title

Applying the Health Belief Model to Predict Intention to Comply with Antibiotic Regimen in Young Adults

Speaker Credentials

Assistant Professor

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

College

College of Pharmacy

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. To determine predictors of intention to comply with prescribed antibiotic regimen in young adults. Methods. The Health Belief Model was used as the conceptual framework in this cross-sectional, descriptive study. After receiving a 10-day oral antibiotic prescription at a university pharmacy, a convenience sample of 201 students completed a short questionnaire on their intention to take the antibiotic as directed, and on their perceptions of susceptibility to illness in general, severity of adverse consequences (e.g., re-infection, future antibiotic resistance) if the antibiotic were not taken as directed, and barriers (e.g., inconvenience, difficulty of use) and benefits (e.g., successful treatment of underlying infection) of taking the antibiotic. Reliability analyses were first conducted for each multi-item 5-point Likert scale before calculating the summated score for the measure. Linear regression was used to determine the association of explanatory variables with intention to take the antibiotic as directed. Results. Usable response rate was 78.6% (n = 158). Scales’ internal consistency ranged from medium to high (Cronbach’s Alpha = .50 to .84). Respondents’ average age was 20.5 (S.D. = 2.0). Those with higher perceived severity of adverse consequences and lower perceived barriers were more likely to respond that they would comply with their antibiotic regimen as directed (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Strategies used by pharmacists when consulting young adults on their antibiotic compliance should include giving them information on the severity of adverse consequences if the regimen were not followed as directed as well as lowering their perceptions of the barriers to taking the antibiotic.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Applying the Health Belief Model to Predict Intention to Comply with Antibiotic Regimen in Young Adults

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. To determine predictors of intention to comply with prescribed antibiotic regimen in young adults. Methods. The Health Belief Model was used as the conceptual framework in this cross-sectional, descriptive study. After receiving a 10-day oral antibiotic prescription at a university pharmacy, a convenience sample of 201 students completed a short questionnaire on their intention to take the antibiotic as directed, and on their perceptions of susceptibility to illness in general, severity of adverse consequences (e.g., re-infection, future antibiotic resistance) if the antibiotic were not taken as directed, and barriers (e.g., inconvenience, difficulty of use) and benefits (e.g., successful treatment of underlying infection) of taking the antibiotic. Reliability analyses were first conducted for each multi-item 5-point Likert scale before calculating the summated score for the measure. Linear regression was used to determine the association of explanatory variables with intention to take the antibiotic as directed. Results. Usable response rate was 78.6% (n = 158). Scales’ internal consistency ranged from medium to high (Cronbach’s Alpha = .50 to .84). Respondents’ average age was 20.5 (S.D. = 2.0). Those with higher perceived severity of adverse consequences and lower perceived barriers were more likely to respond that they would comply with their antibiotic regimen as directed (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Strategies used by pharmacists when consulting young adults on their antibiotic compliance should include giving them information on the severity of adverse consequences if the regimen were not followed as directed as well as lowering their perceptions of the barriers to taking the antibiotic.