Presentation Title

Relationship between Physician Supply and Breast Cancer Survival: A Geographic Approach

Speaker Credentials

OMS-I

Speaker Credentials

BS

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. To explore the possible relationship between the numbers of physicians practicing in defined geographic areas and a subsequent association with breast cancer survival. Background. In 2008, an estimated 250,000 new cases of breast cancer in the United States are expected to be diagnosed. With early detection and intervention, along with improved post-operative treatment, women are also more likely to survive. Disparities remain, however, among geographic regions of the US, for reasons that remain largely unknown. This study takes a look at the possible association between the numbers of physicians in each city within the State of Florida and breast cancer survival among women aged 40+ residing in that city. Methods. Information on the survival rates for breast cancer for each city in Florida was linked with data obtained for the number of practicing physicians in that city. Cox Proportionate Hazard Modeling was used to assess the differences in survival by physician “supply” while controlling for other known risk factors affecting survival. Results. Cox Proportionate Hazard Modeling showed a direct association between the number of physicians practicing in a particular city with breast cancer survival in that particular city (p = 0.0153). This association shows that as physician supply decreased in a defined geographic area (city) so did the time of survival among women with breast cancer in that geographic area. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report an association between physician supply and cancer survival within defined geographic areas. Grants. This research was funded by a 2005 Nova Southeastern University President Faculty Research and Development Grant & the Kenyon Agneski Cancer Research Grant.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Relationship between Physician Supply and Breast Cancer Survival: A Geographic Approach

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. To explore the possible relationship between the numbers of physicians practicing in defined geographic areas and a subsequent association with breast cancer survival. Background. In 2008, an estimated 250,000 new cases of breast cancer in the United States are expected to be diagnosed. With early detection and intervention, along with improved post-operative treatment, women are also more likely to survive. Disparities remain, however, among geographic regions of the US, for reasons that remain largely unknown. This study takes a look at the possible association between the numbers of physicians in each city within the State of Florida and breast cancer survival among women aged 40+ residing in that city. Methods. Information on the survival rates for breast cancer for each city in Florida was linked with data obtained for the number of practicing physicians in that city. Cox Proportionate Hazard Modeling was used to assess the differences in survival by physician “supply” while controlling for other known risk factors affecting survival. Results. Cox Proportionate Hazard Modeling showed a direct association between the number of physicians practicing in a particular city with breast cancer survival in that particular city (p = 0.0153). This association shows that as physician supply decreased in a defined geographic area (city) so did the time of survival among women with breast cancer in that geographic area. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report an association between physician supply and cancer survival within defined geographic areas. Grants. This research was funded by a 2005 Nova Southeastern University President Faculty Research and Development Grant & the Kenyon Agneski Cancer Research Grant.