Presentation Title

Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Osteopathic Manipulation Evaluation (Home) Pilot Study

Speaker Credentials

OMS-III

Speaker Credentials

BS

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. To examine the short and long term impact of osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT) on immune function of HIV positive men who are either antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve or have not taken ART for at least 12 months. In this presentation, we will focus on the short tem impact of OMT. Background. Since the early 20th century, studies have been conducted to determine if OMT impact’s immune function. Some studies have shown transient leukocytosis while another showed a transient basophilia post-OMT. Hodge, 2007, measured significant leukocytosis and increased lymph flow post their OMT protocol. Currently, no experimental studies utilizing OMT to impact immune function have been conducted in an HIV positive population. Methods. We will recruit up to 30 HIV positive men (ages 18-65) and 15 of their friends (P-OMT provider) from a Fort Lauderdale HIV specialty care practice and the NSU medical clinic. Participants will complete 2 stress scales, a daily journal, and monthly blood draws to determine complete blood cell counts with differential, CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ T-cells counts. Participants will be randomly assigned to either delayed treatment control or treatment group. The treatment group will receive a standardized OMT protocol in office monthly and daily OMT at home. Results. Seven participants have been enrolled to date; 2 – 3 are enrolled per week. We will present data on the short term effects of OMT. Conclusions. These results will provide initial information whether OMT impacts HIV positive patient’s immune function in addition to the other already described benefits of the OMT techniques used. Grants. College of Osteopathic Medicine: Behavioral Health Promotions Program; Department of Internal Medicine; Department of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Osteopathic Manipulation Evaluation (Home) Pilot Study

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. To examine the short and long term impact of osteopathic manipulative treatments (OMT) on immune function of HIV positive men who are either antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve or have not taken ART for at least 12 months. In this presentation, we will focus on the short tem impact of OMT. Background. Since the early 20th century, studies have been conducted to determine if OMT impact’s immune function. Some studies have shown transient leukocytosis while another showed a transient basophilia post-OMT. Hodge, 2007, measured significant leukocytosis and increased lymph flow post their OMT protocol. Currently, no experimental studies utilizing OMT to impact immune function have been conducted in an HIV positive population. Methods. We will recruit up to 30 HIV positive men (ages 18-65) and 15 of their friends (P-OMT provider) from a Fort Lauderdale HIV specialty care practice and the NSU medical clinic. Participants will complete 2 stress scales, a daily journal, and monthly blood draws to determine complete blood cell counts with differential, CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ T-cells counts. Participants will be randomly assigned to either delayed treatment control or treatment group. The treatment group will receive a standardized OMT protocol in office monthly and daily OMT at home. Results. Seven participants have been enrolled to date; 2 – 3 are enrolled per week. We will present data on the short term effects of OMT. Conclusions. These results will provide initial information whether OMT impacts HIV positive patient’s immune function in addition to the other already described benefits of the OMT techniques used. Grants. College of Osteopathic Medicine: Behavioral Health Promotions Program; Department of Internal Medicine; Department of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine.