Presentation Title

Effects of Heel and Forefoot Lifts on Body Weight Distribution and Muscle Activity in the Lumbar Region

Speaker Credentials

BS

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Objective. Examine the amount of forefoot or rearfoot heel lift necessary to change weight distribution without altering muscle activity. Background. There is little research showing the effects a negative heel has on center of mass and muscle activity in the lumbar spine and how its’ impact on low back pain. Patients with stenosis of the lumbar spine have relief with forward flexion and therefore, the researchers from this study made the hypothesis that if wearing high heels increases lumbar flexion then the wearing of negative heels or forefoot lifts could perhaps decrease lumbar lordosis. Methods. Thirty-five female students ages 18 to 35 were recruited. Weight distribution and SEMG of the lumbar spine were measured under five conditions: barefoot; 1 and 2 inch heel lifts; ½ and 1 inch forefoot lifts. Results. Wearing ½ inch forefoot lifts increased anterior weight distribution without significantly changing SEMG in the lumbar region. However, wearing 1 inch heel, 2 inch heel, 1 inch forefoot lifts significantly increased SEMG activity. Conclusion. The ½-inch forefoot lift was the only lift that had similar results to barefoot standing without having a significant difference in SEMG activity. The ½ inch forefoot lift can change weight distribution without changing muscle activity. Further research needs to examine if this effect can be demonstrated on patients with lumbar stenosis and if the patients would benefit from the increase in anterior weight distribution by increasing lumbar flexion.

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Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Effects of Heel and Forefoot Lifts on Body Weight Distribution and Muscle Activity in the Lumbar Region

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. Examine the amount of forefoot or rearfoot heel lift necessary to change weight distribution without altering muscle activity. Background. There is little research showing the effects a negative heel has on center of mass and muscle activity in the lumbar spine and how its’ impact on low back pain. Patients with stenosis of the lumbar spine have relief with forward flexion and therefore, the researchers from this study made the hypothesis that if wearing high heels increases lumbar flexion then the wearing of negative heels or forefoot lifts could perhaps decrease lumbar lordosis. Methods. Thirty-five female students ages 18 to 35 were recruited. Weight distribution and SEMG of the lumbar spine were measured under five conditions: barefoot; 1 and 2 inch heel lifts; ½ and 1 inch forefoot lifts. Results. Wearing ½ inch forefoot lifts increased anterior weight distribution without significantly changing SEMG in the lumbar region. However, wearing 1 inch heel, 2 inch heel, 1 inch forefoot lifts significantly increased SEMG activity. Conclusion. The ½-inch forefoot lift was the only lift that had similar results to barefoot standing without having a significant difference in SEMG activity. The ½ inch forefoot lift can change weight distribution without changing muscle activity. Further research needs to examine if this effect can be demonstrated on patients with lumbar stenosis and if the patients would benefit from the increase in anterior weight distribution by increasing lumbar flexion.