Title

Postoperative rehabilitation after hip resurfacing: A systematic review

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-22-2015

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Hip-resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) has become a popular procedure in the treatment of hip-joint arthritis in individuals under the age of 65 y. Although the body of literature examining operative procedures has grown, there is a lack of consistent reporting of the effectiveness of an HRA postoperative rehabilitation program. To date, no systematic reviews have evaluated the available evidence on postoperative rehabilitation programs.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the available evidence on postoperative rehabilitation programs after HRA.

EVIDENCE ACQUISITION:

A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, ProQuest, and Google Scholar was conducted in April 2014 using the following keywords alone and in combination: postoperative, postsurgical, rehabilitation, physical therapy, programs, hip resurfacing, arthroplasty, and metal-on-metal. The grading of studies was conducted using the PEDro and Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine scales.

EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS:

The authors identified 648 citations, 4 of which met the inclusion criteria. The qualifying studies yielded 1 randomized control trial, 2 case reports, and 1 case series, for a total of 90 patients. Patients were mostly male (n = 86), had a mean age of 48 ± 5.47 y, and had been physically active before HRA. Postoperative rehabilitation programs varied in length (range 8-24 wk) and consisted of at least 3 phases. The methodology to assess program effects varied, but all 4 studies did measure a combination of function, pain, and quality of life using written questionnaires, with follow-up ranging from 9 mo to 1 y. The most common questionnaire was the Harris Hip Score.

CONCLUSION:

This review found postoperative rehabilitation programs after HRA to be underinvestigated. Limited results indicate that postoperative rehabilitation programs may be effective in improving gait (stride length, velocity, and cadence), hip range of motion, and pain and function, as measured by questionnaires, but not hip strength.

Publication Title

Journal of Sport Rehabilitation

Volume

25

Issue

2

First Page

181

Last Page

189

ISSN

1056-6716

DOI Number

10-1123/jsr.2014-0270

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