Department of Audiology Faculty Articles

Title

Students’ Evaluation of Audiology Simulation Training

ResearchID/ORCID ID

0000-0003-4997-0270, 0000-0001-6770-4377

ISBN or ISSN

1913-2018

Volume

41

Issue

3

Publication Date / Copyright Date

2017

First Page

289

Last Page

302

Publisher

Canadian Association Of Speech-Language Pathologists And Audiologists

Abstract

The use of simulation in the field of audiology as a strategy and tool for teaching and learning in clinical education programs is increasing. Eliciting feedback from students is important to design, improve, and implement successful simulation learning experiences. Yet, few simulation studies have reported outcomes of student feedback following simulation training. The purpose of this study was to explore students’ perceptions of the simulation training components following 3 simulated hearing screening and parent counselling scenarios. Seventeen Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) students participated in a simulation training, which included the use of a manikin, standardized parents, 3 case scenarios, debriefing sessions, and assessment. This cross-sectional mixed-methods study used a 12-item survey to elicit feedback from the students’ perspective about simulation training components. This survey consisted of 10 statements with a Likert scale rating response methodology (1 = strongly disagree, 7 = strongly agree) and 2 openended questions to elicit written comments. Participants completed the feedback perception tool after the final case scenario. Overall, students agreed or strongly agreed (M = 6.74, SD = 0.32) that the simulation event enhanced their learning experience and opportunities for quality improvement were identified. Results showed student appreciation and recognition of the simulation training as adding value and enhancing their learning experience. Attention to details, organization, adequate time, participants’ feedback, and evaluation when planning and preparing simulation training is one way to achieve higher participant satisfaction levels. Additional research on student perception of simulation training components will provide evidence to inform future simulation training.

Disciplines

Communication Sciences and Disorders | Medicine and Health Sciences | Speech and Hearing Science | Speech Pathology and Audiology

Keywords

audiology, clinical education programs, simulation studies, teaching and learning

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