Presentation Title

Tell a Story: The Visual Blueprint for an Online Course

Location

Conrad

Start

1-16-2018 3:30 PM

End

1-16-2018 4:45 PM

Short Description

Creating online module activities can be daunting. Is there enough content? Is the assessment appropriate? How will it translate to the students? Join Dr. Lisa Martino as she discusses research-based best practices and strategies to develop your online course that will drive distance learning to excellence. You will learn how to create a story with your module objectives using visual placeholders to arrange the workflow and develop an agenda.

Abstract

Distance learning has come a long way. The look and feel of the online course platform constantly evolves, and that is wonderful. However, Driving Distance Learning to Excellence should be rooted in research-based best practice. Chickering and Gamson (1987) developed seven principles, which are still considered relevant today. These principles can be used to guide distance learning to engage students: (1) teacher presence; (2) student collaboration; (3) active learning; (4) prompt feedback; (5) time on task; (6) high expectations; and (7) diverse learning approaches (Chickering & Gamson, 1987).

The trick to developing online courses rooted in best practice is to create a story with the module objectives guided by Chickering and Gamson’s (1987) seven principles. Storytelling aligns well with online courses. A story has a beginning (introduction), a middle (course content), and an end (assessment). A story has a plot; a change occurs (student gains new knowledge). A story has a resolution (module outcome reflection). Using story elements as a framework to design online courses ensures a logical workflow.

Imagery also helps create a story. Visual placeholders can be used to arrange the workflow and develop an agenda in online courses. Visual placeholders represent activities the students and instructor complete within a module. Participants will learn how to create the visual placeholders using PowerPoint. This strategy will create a visual blueprint of the course as a whole and module by module to ensure all seven principles are represented within the story framework. Doing so will create a community of learners, which will drive distance learning to excellence. This presentation session may be useful for program chairs, faculty, course developers, or instructional designers.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education. Retrieved from ERIC database (ED282491).

Format

Concurrent Session

Institutional level targeted

Higher Ed

Moderator

Jennifer Reeves, NSU

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Jan 16th, 3:30 PM Jan 16th, 4:45 PM

Tell a Story: The Visual Blueprint for an Online Course

Conrad

Distance learning has come a long way. The look and feel of the online course platform constantly evolves, and that is wonderful. However, Driving Distance Learning to Excellence should be rooted in research-based best practice. Chickering and Gamson (1987) developed seven principles, which are still considered relevant today. These principles can be used to guide distance learning to engage students: (1) teacher presence; (2) student collaboration; (3) active learning; (4) prompt feedback; (5) time on task; (6) high expectations; and (7) diverse learning approaches (Chickering & Gamson, 1987).

The trick to developing online courses rooted in best practice is to create a story with the module objectives guided by Chickering and Gamson’s (1987) seven principles. Storytelling aligns well with online courses. A story has a beginning (introduction), a middle (course content), and an end (assessment). A story has a plot; a change occurs (student gains new knowledge). A story has a resolution (module outcome reflection). Using story elements as a framework to design online courses ensures a logical workflow.

Imagery also helps create a story. Visual placeholders can be used to arrange the workflow and develop an agenda in online courses. Visual placeholders represent activities the students and instructor complete within a module. Participants will learn how to create the visual placeholders using PowerPoint. This strategy will create a visual blueprint of the course as a whole and module by module to ensure all seven principles are represented within the story framework. Doing so will create a community of learners, which will drive distance learning to excellence. This presentation session may be useful for program chairs, faculty, course developers, or instructional designers.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education. Retrieved from ERIC database (ED282491).