Faculty Articles

Title

How Does Teleneuropsychology Digit Span Measure Up?

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

9-2021

Publication Title

Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology

ISSN or ISBN

0887-6177

Volume

36

Issue/Number

6

Abstract/Excerpt

Objective

To see how strongly performance on a computerized visual digit span task correlates with non-computerized digit span subtests.

Method

The data were chosen from a de-identified database. Undiagnosed adult volunteers (n = 105) took the WAIS-IV Digit Span and TMB Digit Span subtests. Demographic characteristics were as follows: Age (M = 28.5, SD = 11.2), education (M = 16.2, SD = 1.9), gender (60% Female), race (69.8% White). A Pearson correlation was run on the TMB and WAIS-IV longest digit span forward (ldsf) and longest digit span backward (ldsb) raw scores of the same individuals.

Results

Results suggest a moderate correlation between WAIS-IV ldsf (M = 7.14, SD = 1.31) and TMB (M = 6.90, SD = 1.29) ldsf raw scores, r = 0.45, p > 0.01. Moreover, results indicated a moderate correlation between WAIS-IV ldsb (M = 7.69, SD = 1.43) and TMB (M = 5.66, SD = 1.81) ldsb raw scores, r = 0.38, p > 0.01. 73.1% of participants had the same or were within one digit on ldsf scores on both assessments, while 93% were within two digits. 63.8% of participants had the same ldsb scores on both assessments, while 81.9% were within two digits.

Conclusion

Clinicians must note the risk of assuming computerized tests measure the same cognitive functions as standardized paper-and-pencil tests. These results underscore this point. Future studies should continue to assess how well in-person tests align with other computerized tests purporting to measure the same cognitive abilities by examining other variables (i.e., auditory vs. visual, controlled vs. non-controlled environment).

DOI

10.1093/arclin/acab062.209

Peer Reviewed

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