Title

Applying the Transtheoretical Model of Change to Ergonomic Intervention

Location

3033

Format Type

Panel

Format Type

Panel

Start Date

January 2016

End Date

January 2016

Abstract

This applied dissertation identified a more effective method of preventing workplace injuries for the employees in a large, private not-for-profit university, in southern Florida. The study lasted over the course of two months, allowing employees’ ample time for effective participation in a structured study design and interviewing the employee participants.

The study evaluated the effects of the transtheoretical model of change (TTM) on ergonomic intervention. The model established the relationship of individual decision making self-efficacy and characterized (a) the relationship between tailoring interventions to match a person’s readiness (stage of change) and ergonomic intervention; (b) the TTM in symptoms occurrence; and (c) personal choices including those that extended to the workplace causing work related injuries.

Data analysis included memoing, responses to a 47-question questionnaire, and transcription of interviews. This study obtained data from 11 questionnaires as a pre-and post-measurement tool. In addition, analysis of interview instruments, specifically a total of 12- interview sessions over a period of two months, including a decisional balance exercise. The decisional balance construct measured how individuals thought through the pros and cons of both changing and not making a change. The decisional balance exercise identified patterns that were useful to understand how the pros and cons related to the stages of change.

Findings of the study indicated that the employer should use behavior change as a primary model of preventing injuries in line with ergonomic intervention efforts.

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Jan 16th, 3:15 PM Jan 16th, 3:35 PM

Applying the Transtheoretical Model of Change to Ergonomic Intervention

3033

This applied dissertation identified a more effective method of preventing workplace injuries for the employees in a large, private not-for-profit university, in southern Florida. The study lasted over the course of two months, allowing employees’ ample time for effective participation in a structured study design and interviewing the employee participants.

The study evaluated the effects of the transtheoretical model of change (TTM) on ergonomic intervention. The model established the relationship of individual decision making self-efficacy and characterized (a) the relationship between tailoring interventions to match a person’s readiness (stage of change) and ergonomic intervention; (b) the TTM in symptoms occurrence; and (c) personal choices including those that extended to the workplace causing work related injuries.

Data analysis included memoing, responses to a 47-question questionnaire, and transcription of interviews. This study obtained data from 11 questionnaires as a pre-and post-measurement tool. In addition, analysis of interview instruments, specifically a total of 12- interview sessions over a period of two months, including a decisional balance exercise. The decisional balance construct measured how individuals thought through the pros and cons of both changing and not making a change. The decisional balance exercise identified patterns that were useful to understand how the pros and cons related to the stages of change.

Findings of the study indicated that the employer should use behavior change as a primary model of preventing injuries in line with ergonomic intervention efforts.