Title

Ireland in pictures: Intercultural competence among undergraduate college students

Location

3033

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

January 2016

End Date

January 2016

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to look at the ways undergraduate students view an international experience by using pictures. Various forms of photography can be used for data collection and for organizing, interpreting, and validating qualitative inquiry (Szto, Furman, & Langer, 2005). As a qualitative research method for the social sciences narrative inquiry has a long tradition because of its power to elicit voice. Narrative analysis values the signs, the symbols, and the expression of feelings in language, validating how the narrator constructs meaning. Narrative inquiry is especially useful when exploring issues of social change, causality, and social identity (Elliott, 2005). The project was conducted in rural Western Ireland with 14 undergraduate students led by a social work faculty member and a history faculty member. Our research question was: What is the personal impact of study abroad participation in Ireland? Students were given the following directions to complete the project: (In your narrative photo project, Please insert a photo that you feel represents Irish Culture and speaks to you personally, Talk about the photo (ex. Where was it taken? What day?, etc), Is/Are there an underlying meaning(s) that you feel truly represents Irish Culture?.) The richness and depth of these narratives shows how powerful an international experience can be on a young student.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 15th, 4:25 PM Jan 15th, 4:45 PM

Ireland in pictures: Intercultural competence among undergraduate college students

3033

The purpose of this paper is to look at the ways undergraduate students view an international experience by using pictures. Various forms of photography can be used for data collection and for organizing, interpreting, and validating qualitative inquiry (Szto, Furman, & Langer, 2005). As a qualitative research method for the social sciences narrative inquiry has a long tradition because of its power to elicit voice. Narrative analysis values the signs, the symbols, and the expression of feelings in language, validating how the narrator constructs meaning. Narrative inquiry is especially useful when exploring issues of social change, causality, and social identity (Elliott, 2005). The project was conducted in rural Western Ireland with 14 undergraduate students led by a social work faculty member and a history faculty member. Our research question was: What is the personal impact of study abroad participation in Ireland? Students were given the following directions to complete the project: (In your narrative photo project, Please insert a photo that you feel represents Irish Culture and speaks to you personally, Talk about the photo (ex. Where was it taken? What day?, etc), Is/Are there an underlying meaning(s) that you feel truly represents Irish Culture?.) The richness and depth of these narratives shows how powerful an international experience can be on a young student.