Title

Stretching Exercises in Intersectionality : Using Qualitative Methods to Enhance Family Therapy Training

Location

3034

Format Type

Event

Start Date

January 2016

End Date

January 2016

Abstract

Familiarization with systems on a variety of levels and across a diversity of cultures is a hallmark of family therapy training. Yet implementing this type of training requires critical thinking, creativity and innovation. Borrowing from TQR 2015 Plenary Speaker Valerie Janesick’s work on Stretching Exercises for Qualitative Researchers and practices of ethnography and reflexivity, we discuss our experiences as instructors and students using qualitative skills in a Family Therapy graduate course designed to enhance understanding about the power differentials embedded within intersectionality on our professional lives. Fieldwork exercises were used to promote examination of the dynamics of oppression and marginalization in dimensions of diversity including class, race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, ability, language and nationality, with special emphasis upon how these shape family process and the therapeutic process. Students from the course will share their experience of fieldwork assignments used to understand lived experience when impacted by marginalizing and oppressive patterns.

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Jan 15th, 10:00 AM Jan 15th, 12:00 PM

Stretching Exercises in Intersectionality : Using Qualitative Methods to Enhance Family Therapy Training

3034

Familiarization with systems on a variety of levels and across a diversity of cultures is a hallmark of family therapy training. Yet implementing this type of training requires critical thinking, creativity and innovation. Borrowing from TQR 2015 Plenary Speaker Valerie Janesick’s work on Stretching Exercises for Qualitative Researchers and practices of ethnography and reflexivity, we discuss our experiences as instructors and students using qualitative skills in a Family Therapy graduate course designed to enhance understanding about the power differentials embedded within intersectionality on our professional lives. Fieldwork exercises were used to promote examination of the dynamics of oppression and marginalization in dimensions of diversity including class, race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, ability, language and nationality, with special emphasis upon how these shape family process and the therapeutic process. Students from the course will share their experience of fieldwork assignments used to understand lived experience when impacted by marginalizing and oppressive patterns.