Title

Scientific Creativity: MeProB

Location

1048

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

January 2016

End Date

January 2016

Abstract

Frederick Leong and James T Austin in their 2006 publication of The psychology research handbook: A guide for graduate students and research assistants discuss the role of scientific creativity in regards to the creation of a research topic and the formulation of a problem. Furthermore, they posit that the scientific creative process is less taxing if the researcher approaches using searching strategies in the following domains: personal interests, environmental, work and life, experiences and the use of electronic sources. We employed the searching strategies highlighted in the literature to build a digitized scientific architectural platform called MeProB. MeProB in an interactive software that through a series of probes, in successive approximations, enables doctoral students to identify a dissertation topic and a research problem. The architectural logic of MeProB prompts students to think about their professional experiences and/or interests and to identify areas of concern that potentially could be research topics. Once the student identifies the most pressing concerns they are prompted to find evidence and/or literature that will document the problem and to use the compiled evidence to justify the merits of a study. The MeProB methodology employs an algorithm that combines the evidence from practice and the scholarly literature to yield a research problem. This paper will present information about scientific creativity, a discussion of the MeProB interactive software and the experiences of doctoral students who have used MeProB.

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Jan 14th, 3:30 PM Jan 14th, 3:50 PM

Scientific Creativity: MeProB

1048

Frederick Leong and James T Austin in their 2006 publication of The psychology research handbook: A guide for graduate students and research assistants discuss the role of scientific creativity in regards to the creation of a research topic and the formulation of a problem. Furthermore, they posit that the scientific creative process is less taxing if the researcher approaches using searching strategies in the following domains: personal interests, environmental, work and life, experiences and the use of electronic sources. We employed the searching strategies highlighted in the literature to build a digitized scientific architectural platform called MeProB. MeProB in an interactive software that through a series of probes, in successive approximations, enables doctoral students to identify a dissertation topic and a research problem. The architectural logic of MeProB prompts students to think about their professional experiences and/or interests and to identify areas of concern that potentially could be research topics. Once the student identifies the most pressing concerns they are prompted to find evidence and/or literature that will document the problem and to use the compiled evidence to justify the merits of a study. The MeProB methodology employs an algorithm that combines the evidence from practice and the scholarly literature to yield a research problem. This paper will present information about scientific creativity, a discussion of the MeProB interactive software and the experiences of doctoral students who have used MeProB.