Title

When Qualitative Teachers Care: A Roundtable

Location

Knight Auditorium

Format Type

Plenary

Start Date

14-1-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

14-1-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

When Qualitative Teachers Care: A Roundtable

Cynthia Lubin Langtiw, PsyD

Associate Professor

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Nancy Bothne, PhD

Assistant Professor

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

To educate as the practice of freedom is a way of teaching that anyone can learn. That learning process comes easiest to those of us who teach who also believe that there is an aspect of our vocation that is sacred; who believe that our work is not merely to share information but to share in the intellectual and spiritual growth of our students. To teach in a manner that respects and cares for the souls of our students is essential if we are to provide the necessary conditions where learning can most deeply and intimately begin. Throughout my years as student and professor, I have been most inspired by those teachers who have had the courage to transgress those boundaries that would confine each pupil to a rote, assembly-line approach to learning. (hooks ,1994 p. 13)

It takes deep courage to embark on the transformational journey of teaching. The murky waters of qualitative research make the teaching journey even more tenuous. As teachers of qualitative research we are tasked with teaching research from a paradigm with which many students are not familiar. Students often approach qualitative research with misgivings, misconceptions and high hopes. And as teachers of qualitative research we help them navigate the murky waters. We shift the paradigm. We peel back the curtain. We sit with them in their moments of uncertainty. We help them tell their story to the institutional review boards so they can tell their participants’ stories. We entertain their lofty ideas and help them bring them to fruition. We care for them.

In this roundtable we will explore the strategies that we use to care for our students, and ourselves, as we teach qualitative research. Bring your syllabi, creative assignments, foibles and successes and we will delve into the depths of caring and teaching, together.

Reference

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom.

New York: Routledge.

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Jan 14th, 4:00 PM Jan 14th, 5:00 PM

When Qualitative Teachers Care: A Roundtable

Knight Auditorium

When Qualitative Teachers Care: A Roundtable

Cynthia Lubin Langtiw, PsyD

Associate Professor

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Nancy Bothne, PhD

Assistant Professor

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

To educate as the practice of freedom is a way of teaching that anyone can learn. That learning process comes easiest to those of us who teach who also believe that there is an aspect of our vocation that is sacred; who believe that our work is not merely to share information but to share in the intellectual and spiritual growth of our students. To teach in a manner that respects and cares for the souls of our students is essential if we are to provide the necessary conditions where learning can most deeply and intimately begin. Throughout my years as student and professor, I have been most inspired by those teachers who have had the courage to transgress those boundaries that would confine each pupil to a rote, assembly-line approach to learning. (hooks ,1994 p. 13)

It takes deep courage to embark on the transformational journey of teaching. The murky waters of qualitative research make the teaching journey even more tenuous. As teachers of qualitative research we are tasked with teaching research from a paradigm with which many students are not familiar. Students often approach qualitative research with misgivings, misconceptions and high hopes. And as teachers of qualitative research we help them navigate the murky waters. We shift the paradigm. We peel back the curtain. We sit with them in their moments of uncertainty. We help them tell their story to the institutional review boards so they can tell their participants’ stories. We entertain their lofty ideas and help them bring them to fruition. We care for them.

In this roundtable we will explore the strategies that we use to care for our students, and ourselves, as we teach qualitative research. Bring your syllabi, creative assignments, foibles and successes and we will delve into the depths of caring and teaching, together.

Reference

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom.

New York: Routledge.