Title

Using a Non-Judgmental Stance to Promote Trustworthiness in Action Research

Location

2073

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

14-1-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

14-1-2017 3:50 PM

Abstract

Interviewing as a primary source of data is subject to the trustworthiness of the respondents. As lecturers interviewing our students, we understand that the nature of our relationship could have an impact on the trustworthiness of our data. We believed that adopting a non-judgemental stance could resolve this issue. We implemented an action research to improve our teaching of French with Facebook on mobile phones. In order to provide all students with equal learning opportunities, we gave everyone a subsidy to cover the cost of mobile Internet access. We regularly interviewed our students to evaluate our action plan. In order to remain open to all interpretation of the events and to promote honest feedback, we openly adopted a non-judgmental stance. As a result, students freely revealed how they used funds, which were given to them, to access mobile Internet. Findings showed that not all students used the money as we had anticipated and that they spoke without restraints on the matter. Based on this behavior, we reflected on how this stance helped validate the trustworthiness of the data for the research and encouraged us to focus on not judging our informants.

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Jan 14th, 3:00 PM Jan 14th, 3:50 PM

Using a Non-Judgmental Stance to Promote Trustworthiness in Action Research

2073

Interviewing as a primary source of data is subject to the trustworthiness of the respondents. As lecturers interviewing our students, we understand that the nature of our relationship could have an impact on the trustworthiness of our data. We believed that adopting a non-judgemental stance could resolve this issue. We implemented an action research to improve our teaching of French with Facebook on mobile phones. In order to provide all students with equal learning opportunities, we gave everyone a subsidy to cover the cost of mobile Internet access. We regularly interviewed our students to evaluate our action plan. In order to remain open to all interpretation of the events and to promote honest feedback, we openly adopted a non-judgmental stance. As a result, students freely revealed how they used funds, which were given to them, to access mobile Internet. Findings showed that not all students used the money as we had anticipated and that they spoke without restraints on the matter. Based on this behavior, we reflected on how this stance helped validate the trustworthiness of the data for the research and encouraged us to focus on not judging our informants.