Title

"Data Sketches" as Arts-based Analysis Tool for Multimodal Data

Location

2072

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

14-1-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

14-1-2017 3:50 PM

Abstract

As a departure from the text-based terms such as field notes or "field texts" (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000), I engage with multimodal research data through “data sketches.” I define this as a type of researcher memo emphasizing the dynamic, fleeting, and shifting quality of reflexive processes. The use of the term “sketch” alludes to a temporary documentation of an idea in development, which is meant to contribute to a greater work. The multimodal versions of data sketches I create document my brainstorming and preliminary analysis. Researchers can use more traditional sketch-like drawing or use digital tools to combine various types of image-based data, audio or video clips, written transcriptions, or other written researcher notes or memos. The combined "data sketch" is meant to support the researcher with seeing and documenting new connections, note emerging questions, focus attention on particular interplay between modes, or generate other meaning-making intersections. The data sketches are intended to assist analysis, but can also be shared to reveal the research process. In my own work with digital storytelling, I include screenshots from video in my data sketch, which spur my written researcher reflections and connect with related literature from various disciplines. I use various free online tools (such as Prezi) that offer an expanding (infinite) “canvas” on which to work. This flexible digital tool to create the data sketch allows video clips to be embedded, links to data sources, and supports constant changes as the researcher re-focuses attention and as the research shifts and develops.

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Jan 14th, 3:00 PM Jan 14th, 3:50 PM

"Data Sketches" as Arts-based Analysis Tool for Multimodal Data

2072

As a departure from the text-based terms such as field notes or "field texts" (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000), I engage with multimodal research data through “data sketches.” I define this as a type of researcher memo emphasizing the dynamic, fleeting, and shifting quality of reflexive processes. The use of the term “sketch” alludes to a temporary documentation of an idea in development, which is meant to contribute to a greater work. The multimodal versions of data sketches I create document my brainstorming and preliminary analysis. Researchers can use more traditional sketch-like drawing or use digital tools to combine various types of image-based data, audio or video clips, written transcriptions, or other written researcher notes or memos. The combined "data sketch" is meant to support the researcher with seeing and documenting new connections, note emerging questions, focus attention on particular interplay between modes, or generate other meaning-making intersections. The data sketches are intended to assist analysis, but can also be shared to reveal the research process. In my own work with digital storytelling, I include screenshots from video in my data sketch, which spur my written researcher reflections and connect with related literature from various disciplines. I use various free online tools (such as Prezi) that offer an expanding (infinite) “canvas” on which to work. This flexible digital tool to create the data sketch allows video clips to be embedded, links to data sources, and supports constant changes as the researcher re-focuses attention and as the research shifts and develops.